Getting to the truch behind farmed salmon

At the Cohen Commission hearings, lawyers for BC, Canada and the fish farm industry were effective in diverting attention away from the truth, and this may compromise Justice Bruce Cohen in making final recommendations based on the truth.

At the Cohen Commission hearings, lawyers for BC, Canada and the fish farm industry were effective in diverting attention away from the truth, and this may compromise Justice Bruce Cohen in making final recommendations based on the truth.

Well-respected Dr. Alexandra Morton, marine biologist, points out the truth: Only the sockeye runs that closely passed by salmon farms collapsed.

The clinical condition and genomic evidence point to a mystery sickness that began in chinook salmon farms on the Fraser sockeye route in the early 1990s, exactly when the sockeye began to collapse.

When the Norwegian companies quietly removed the chinook farms mid-2007, the first sockeye generation that went to sea since 1992 without being exposed to fish farms returned in historic numbers in 2010.

In 1988, the provincial government went to the Broughton Archipelago and asked the locals where they should not put salmon farms.

The government said they would not accept any applications for fin fish farms in these red zones.  The truth is they put 14 open-net salmon farms exactly in those red zones.

The truth is that fish farms placed on wild salmon migration routes pose real threats to the survival of wild salmon because they create harmful sea lice amplification, they attempt to prevent viral infections of farmed fish with antibiotics, and control sea lice with chemicals.

The weight of evidence is enough to justify removal of open-net farms, starting with the 14 fish farms in the red zones where the province said they would not accept any applications for fin fish farms.   A co-management regime needs to be established to include First Nations people along the Fraser River to govern the aquaculture industry to protect aboriginal rights to harvest wild salmon we have depended upon since time immemorial.

Eddie Gardner