Old conflicts could hurt B.C.’s prosperity

Amidst the threat of further political fragmentation, B.C. is entering a critical period and we the people who pay for everything are seemingly unable to steer the province away from the dangerous waters of political fragmentation.

A further deterioration could have a negative effect in the broader economically stability of B.C., where regional harmony continues to be undermined by old conflicts perpetuated by the NDP.

So fierce is the political rivalry directed at the government by the opposition that the NDP can not set aside their differences long enough to agree on what is best for the people of B.C.

In the absence of a non-partisan approach, and with absolutely no hint of a resolution to the province’s political deadlock, the NDP’s own democratic credentials are in question while business, after business professional contradict the opposition’s HST claims.

This creates uncertainty, a bad omen for a province considered a key factor for Canada’s overall the stability, as well, will hinder current and future investments.

This is the question that seems to provoke the most fear for B.C.’s prosperity and stability because it could alter, if not reverse, much of the good work that has been accomplished over the last 10 years.

In that time, the country has gone through bouts of instability, including a period when the opposition brought down parliament.

Canadians heard the message calling for constructive dialogue and compromise to resolve political differences, choosing stability over conflict, returning Mr. Harper one of the largest majority in Canadian history.

The change proves Canada to be a country with two faces. The first face is rapid growth. The other face is marred by the political and institutional dead-ends and lack of collaboration and consensus that obstruct proper governance and delay prosperity.

I think B.C.ers see the point and the value brought to our shared prosperity by the government, and see the need  to prevent a chain reaction of instability that could undermine yet more by the “weakest links.”

 

William Perry