B.C. signs on for federal training program

Employer-funded training is step to "re-engineer our education system," says federal Employment Minister Jason Kenney

Jobs Minister Shirley Bond

B.C. has signed on to the federal government’s program to match skills training with employers’ needs, after negotiations to maintain most of the existing programs to assist older and disadvantaged people.

B.C. Jobs Minister Shirley Bond signed onto the Canada Job Grant program in Ottawa Monday, as provinces and territories agreed to a program that requires employers to put up a third of training costs. Once the program takes effect, the federal share will be up to $10,000 per trainee with another $5,000 from a sponsoring employer.

Federal Employment Minister Jason Kenney said the new program will address the need for thousands of skilled workers to develop liquefied natural gas plants, pipelines and other projects in B.C. There is no general labour shortage in Canada, but the $900 million a year the federal government spends on post-secondary training needs to match up better with the available jobs, he said.

“So we need to re-engineer our education system,” Kenney said. “B.C. has taken the lead on this, to prepare young people for the jobs of the future, to educate them for the labour market.”

The agreement means B.C. will use 40% of Ottawa’s $65 million annual skills training transfer for the new program.

“We very much support the concept of employer-led and driven employment programs, and I think that’s actually where we ended up with the Canada Job Grant file,” Bond said.

B.C. objected to the program initially, because it would have taken federal money away from existing training programs for disadvantaged groups. Kenney said the amended deal allows 90 per cent of B.C.’s training programs to carry on.

One of those is a 2007 federal-provincial program for workers aged 55 to 64 in communities with fewer than 250,000 people that have high unemployment or closure of employers.

 

Just Posted

Massive fire destroys Agassiz dairy barn

Reports say at least one cow died in the blaze

First court date in Chilliwack for man accused of murdering Belgian tourist

Family and friends of Sean McKenzie, 27, filled the gallery for brief court appearance Wednesday

Another successful year for Chilliwack’s ‘We Got Your Back’ backpack program

Sponsored by local businesses, program stocks backpacks with school supplies for students in need

Group forms in Hope to respond to homelessness, trauma and addictions

Homelessness Action Response Table (HART) full of local, regional, provincial movers and shakers

B.C. man facing first-degree murder charge in death of Belgian tourist

Amelie Sakkalis’ body was found on Aug. 22 near Boston Bar

VIDEO: Messages of hope, encouragement line bars of B.C. bridge

WARNING: This story contains references to suicide and may not be appropriate for all audiences.

Burnaby pedestrian in hospital after being hit crossing busy street

Driver remained on scene, is speaking to RCMP

5 to start your day

Massive barn fire in Agassiz, messages of hope line Vancouver-area bridge and more

The longest week: Carolinas worn out by Florence

Frustration and sheer exhaustion are building as thousands of people wait to go home seven days after the storm began battering the coast.

Vancouver councillors move ahead with policy for duplexes on detached home lots

Mayor Gregor Robertson says the decision is another step toward adding homes in the city for the so-called “missing middle.”

Canada’s goal is to play in a medal game at World Cup in Spain

The 2014 women’s world basketball championships were a coming out party for Canada.

World Anti-Doping Agency reinstates Russia

There was no mention of Russia publicly accepting a state-sponsored conspiracy to help its athletes win Olympic medals by doping.

Most Read