Riders will need to don face coverings to ski and snowboard at Manning this winter. (Manning Park Resort photo)

Riders will need to don face coverings to ski and snowboard at Manning this winter. (Manning Park Resort photo)

Mandatory face coverings, wiping down chair lifts all part of Manning winter plans

Winter season at Manning Park Resort to start Dec. 11, winter ops plan details COVID-19 measures

Skiers and boarders hitting Manning Park Resort slopes this winter will need to wear facial coverings on all parts of the mountain.

Set to open for its winter season Dec. 11, the resort set out rules for its winter season which include not allowing anyone on the mountain without a face covering. The only exceptions to this are when eating or drinking, when skiing or snowboarding if physical distancing can be maintained and for riders under three whose wearing of a face covering is recommended but not mandatory.

“If you can shred the pow while maintaining proper physical distancing, facial coverings are not required during the physical acts of skiing and snowboarding,” the resort stated. “If not, it is recommended that you wear a facial covering.”

If a neck gaiter or buff covers the nose and mouth, they will be accepted, the resort stated.

Physical distancing will be enforced on the mountain. While waiting in line for the lifts, skis and snowboards will help keep people naturally distanced and the resort will be putting up markers as well.

Lifts will be loaded as normal, but people can request to load only together with their ‘bubble.’ For riders riding alone on the Quad Bear Chair, they will be placed on the opposite side of the lift from another single rider. For single riders on the Blue Chair or the T-bar, they will be riding alone.

To keep the hills from being too busy, the resort stated there may be times when attendance might be limited. Cash won’t be accepted at the resort and tickets can be bought online in advance. For people wanting to take lessons, only advance online bookings will be accepted.

The now-standard physical distancing will be enforced in the entire resort, and staff will be undergoing daily health screenings. Cleaning and disinfecting of high-touch surfaces is also in Manning Park’s plan, this includes cleaning chairlifts and washrooms frequently. And rental equipment will also be sanitized.

The resort has also added an outdoor barbecue with seating at the Whiskey Jack Bistro, as well as outdoor seating beside the guest services building.

General manager Vern Schram noted that as COVID-19 is an ever-evolving pandemic, there may be adjustments to the operational plans. More details can be found at manningpark.com/covid-19-winter-operations/.

The resort has already reached their limit for regular alpine season passes sold for the upcoming season. Due to the ‘incredible demand’, Schram said they have added a midweek only pass for seniors and adults.

Do you have something to add to this story, or something else we should report on? Email:
emelie.peacock@hopestandard.com


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