New business adds to local health options

Elsie Meyers specializes in reflexology and kinesiology techniques

Elsie Meyers recently opened Healthpoints Reflexology & Kinesthetics in Hope.

Elsie Meyers hopes her new business will help ease people’s muscle tension and encourage relaxation.

She has been practicing reflexology for over 25 years, and is also trained in specialized kinesiology, advanced Bowen techniques, Swedish massage, raindrop therapy and emotional freedom therapy. After recently moving to Hope from Medicine Hat, Alta., she realized the potential for such services in town and decided to open Healthpoints Reflexology & Kinesthetics.

“I wanted to be a compliment to the other massage therapists and activities here,” said Meyers. “Hope seems to be an area where people are really concerned about getting back to nature and doing things in a natural way. So the techniques I use enable the body to help itself. It’s like turning on switches.”

Long-term stress can result in many chronic conditions including heart disease, chronic depression, high blood pressure, migraine headaches, digestive disorders, and arthritis. Meyers uses techniques based on traditional Chinese medicine to help prevent or alleviate the effects of these conditions.

“I do a lot of work on the neck and shoulder area to relieve the stress of working on computers. When you’re sitting in a stationary position at computers for hours, usually the neck muscles shorten because we’re looking down,” said Meyers. “If it isn’t addressed early, it can progress to bigger issues. It’s important for all body health.”

Reflexology is a gentle compression technique that stimulates the reflexes on the feet, hands, ears and head. Meyers said these reflexes help the body function more effectively.

Kinesthetics, on the other hand, is the movement of muscles. Meyers pointed out that one of the most effective methods of improving movement is by means of Bowen Technique. The soft tissue technique was developed by Dr. Tom Bowen, an Australian chiropractor for the Australian soccer team in the 1970s. This method of “cross-fiber” movement of muscle addresses proprioceptors in the muscles. Cellular memory is affected during the session of muscle movement, followed by a brief “resting” time as the muscles reposition.

Healthpoints Reflexology & Kinesthetics operates out of the Hope Chiropractic Care Centre (314 Hudson Bay St.) Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. Sessions are covered under some extended health benefit packages.

For more information, visit healthpoints-hope.com or call 604-869-0555.

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