Hope filmmaker Eva Wunderman’s documentary Edna’s Bloodline tells the story of distant relatives in Sweden and Nunavut, who discover they are connected by one fascinating explorer. Facebook photo

Hope filmmaker showing back-to-back documentaries Thursday

B.C. premiere of Edna’s Bloodline to be shown, followed by local historical doc Canyon War

Local filmmaker Eva Wunderman is taking over the Hope Cinema Thursday, with back-to-back films Edna’s Bloodline and Canyon War: The Untold Story.

The films are being shown on the 160th anniversary of the Fraser River Gold Rush and the Canyon War, and offer both a retrospective of settler and Indigenous history and a look at some of Wunderman’s documentary work.

Each work is quite different, set in different parts of Canada and different historical periods, yet they each have to do with Indigenous peoples and their interactions with settlers and colonizers.

Edna’s Bloodline follows the first meeting of two great-grandchildren of an arctic explorer from Sweden, Petter Norberg, who live in wildly different parts of the world and are unknown to each other, to begin with. The film brought Wunderman to Canada’s high arctic, more precisely Kugluktuk, Nunavut.

A resident of Canada since 1981, her time in the Arctic was something completely different. Shooting a film in the unimaginable cold wearing six layers of clothing, and feeding on a wonderful diet of muskox and polar bear were some moments she remembers, as well as the seal hunt with Norberg’s granddaughter and former Commissioner of Nunavut Edna Elias.

“They took us out in this boat to go seal hunting and they take off, way out. I mean you don’t see land, there are no trees, so after a while, there is nothing but you and the ocean,” she said. “And you’re sitting there with no life jacket, and you’re thinking ‘well, life jacket, what do you need that for? If you fall in the cold water you’re not going to survive.’”

Edna’s Bloodline will screen first on Aug. 16, followed by Canyon War which delves into a little-known but bloody war waged between miner militiamen and Indigenous groups and how peace was achieved through the efforts of N’lakapamux Chief Spintlum and Henry Snyder, a U.S. miner and militia captain.

Wunderman said the first time Canyon War screened it was a full house—the history is hyper-local and many residents were extras in the film, so the connections to the community are plentiful.

Historian Daniel Marshall, without whom Wunderman said Canyon War would never have become a reality, will launch his latest work at the event Aug. 16. His book Claiming the Land: British Columbia and the Making of a New El Dorado focuses on 1858, the year of the Fraser River Gold Rush and some of its lesser-known histories.

Doors of the Hope Cinema open 7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 16 with the film showing starting at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $10.


Is there more to this story?


news@hopestandard.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

 

Hope-based filmmaker Eva Wunderman. Submitted photo

Just Posted

Chilliwack trustees divided on Trans Mountain pipeline route near two schools

School district will pen letter to NEB to ask for re-routing away from schools to be considered

After 30 years, Agassiz’s Miss Marge set to retire from Variety Play

From 1989 to today, Miss Marge has taken generations of kids through the district play program

Crime Stoppers urges Lower Mainland residents to check these 9 safety items every night

Home security tips demonstrated at Cloverdale house on Wednesday

Hope raises almost $700 for Tillicum Centre

By purchasing art on display locally, community raised $690 for the adult centre

Calling all Fraser Canyon golfers: it’s time to tee into great summer savings

BC Lung Association is back to selling its Golf Savings Book

VIDEO: Acknowledging skeptics, finance minister vows to build Trans Mountain project

Bill Morneau said he recognizes ‘huge amount of anxiety’ in Calgary over future of oil and gas sector

B.C. man faces deportation over father’s honour-killing conviction

Father lied to immigration, was later acquitted of charges in Jassi Sidhu’s murder

New RCMP policy is a little hairy

Members now allowed to grow beards and goatees

Girl, 10, poisoned by carbon monoxide at B.C. campsite could soon return home

Lucille Beaurain died and daughter Micaela Walton, 10, was rushed to B.C. Children’s Hospital on May 18

30 years later: B.C. woman uses sidewalk chalk to reclaim site of her sexual assault

Vancouver woman didn’t think her powerful story, written in chalk, would ignite such support

Slain friend motivates rookie football player to make it with hometown B.C. Lions

Jaylen Sandhu, stabbed to death in 2014, a source of inspiration for promising RB Jamel Lyles

Men caught with illegal gun near Burnaby elementary school

They were sitting in a parked car near Cameron Elementary

Home care for B.C.’s elderly is too expensive and falls short: watchdog

Report says seniors must pay $8,800 a year for daily visits under provincial home support program

B.C. ‘struggling’ to meet needs of vulnerable youth in contracted care: auditor

Auditor general says youth in contracted residential services may not be getting support they need

Most Read