Upcoming events focus on local community forest

Group will host a discovery night May 27 and summer walks

Land occupied by the Cascade Lower Canyon Community Forest

A new education initiative is underway to create community awareness about forest ecology and forestry management.

The Cascade Lower Canyon Community Forest (CLCCF) is hosting a Discovery Night at the Blue Moose on May 27, followed by a summer community forest walk in three of the forest locations (Hope, Yale and Sunshine Valley).

The Discovery Night starts at 6:30 p.m., with a presentation by Brian Taylor, board member of the CLCCF, at 7 p.m.

High school presentations for Grade 11 biology students about forest ecology and forestry practices are also slated for the summer.

Although a community forest initiative is relatively new to the area, it is not new to British Columbia. The B.C. Ministry of Forests, Land and Natural Resources have released more than 50 community managed forests in B.C. alone since 1998 under the Forest Act.

The CLCCF started the application process for a community forest license back in 2002. The lease was secured in December 2011, with the first logging occurring near Emory Creek late last year. The organization is made up of three partners: Yale First Nations, District of Hope and Fraser Valley Regional District. They form a not-for-profit organization which has secured a 25-year (renewable) lease for the purpose of a community forest. The tenure runs from Flood (10 km west of Hope) to Yale (26 km east of Hope) on both sides of the Fraser River. This same land was previously forestry tenure, logged by private companies.

A community forest is different to usual forest tenure whereby the forest is managed by the community for the benefit of the community. The community is considered a stakeholder and as such has input into the management of the forest. The board encourages conversation with the community because their role is to represent residents. Some people have indicated areas they wish to conserve, others are interested in the recreational purposes such as the creation of trails. The forest provides long-term community economic development, local employment, improves incentives to consider long-term benefits of sustainable management, protection of drinkable watersheds, landscapes and views and other values that are important to our community.

Aside from local employment, all of the profit goes back into the community by way of community grants. As logging began last year, some of the first grants were awarded.

Hope Mountain Centre received a grant to provide the high school education program, and Hope Mountain Black Bear Committee received funding for their education programs as well as the GOGRIZZ phone line which provides important data to the ministry and public.

For more information about the community forest, visit www.clccf.ca.

Just Posted

River Monsters attract nearly 300 swimmers to their two-day meet

This was the third year for the now-annual event

PHOTOS: Sasquatch Days about ‘being proud of being Sts’ailes’

The joint event between Harrison and Sts’ailes returned to the village for its eighth year

‘This was my baby’: Music teacher to retire after 29 years at Kent Elementary

Brenda Di Rezze will be saying goodbye to her music room at the end of this school year

New Farmer’s Market coming to downtown Hope

Markets will be hosted every Friday on 3rd Avenue

SD78 growth plan to focus on inclusive learning, reading

Data collection and collaboration will help schools meet goals, superintendent says

10 facts about Father’s Day

Did you know that the special day for dads was first celebrated in 1910?

Bombers down B.C. Lions 33-23 in season opener

Former Lion Andrew Harris leads Winnipeg with 148 rushing yards

Northern B.C. family remembers murdered Indigenous woman with memorial walk

Still no closure for Ramona Wilson’s family 25 years later

Pride flag taken down by Township of Langley

Woman said she was told it was removed from her front yard because of a complaint

B.C. university to offer mentorship program for former youth in care

Students using the provincial tuition waiver program will soon be able to form a community at KPU

Cyclists competing in one of the toughest bike races on the planet pass through Fernie

Divide riders looking strong as they finish first leg of 4160 km race

You might not know these B.C. records are public

Hired a lawyer to file a civil claim? Those are published online

B.C. bus driver loses case to get job back after texting while driving full bus

An arbitator ruled that Tim Wesman’s phone usage was a “a reckless disregard for public safety”

Revamped B.C. Lions set to battle veteran Winnipeg Blue Bombers

The Lions’ first test of the season will be a big one

Most Read