Hope author releases new novel

Forty per cent of net proceeds from each book sale are donated to local charities

Ed VanWoudenberg and Jeffica VanGrootheest hold a copy of VanWoudenberg’s new novel Worth a Talk.

A new novel by Ed VanWoudenberg explores many of the challenges teenagers face today.

The Hope author presents a story of adventure and conflict involving many individuals from troubled backgrounds, who each play important roles in Worth a Talk.

The primary characters however are members of three Christian families living under very challenging circumstances.

“Whether you’re brought up in a church family or not, the problems are the same,” said VanWoudenberg.

“This is definitely a warning to make the right decisions while you can because the consequences are terrible. The book has a compassionate angle as well. We’re often so judgmental, but God doesn’t write us off and he keeps coming back to us with warnings and invitation.”

The 32-chapter, 580-page novel brings the reader face-to-face with many issues, including spousal abuse, addiction, bullying, drug dealing and drug use, lying, shoplifting, abortion, chastity, drunk driving resulting in death, street gangs, pornography, occultism, kidnapping, prostitution, pedophilia and cyber bullying.

VanWoudenberg provides clear biblical answers and practical guidelines throughout the fictional narrative. The end of the book also has a section called Lets Talk Further with thought-provoking questions related to each chapter.

For more than 25 years, VanWoudenberg and his wife Audrey have visited and counselled inmates in prison. He also serves as a chaplain at Stepping Stones Bible Camp in Deroche.

Over the past 10 years, VanWoudenberg said he’s seen first-hand the consequences of bad choices made by young people as well as the healing effects of the Gospel when its principles are applied.

Worth a Talk can be purchased for $24.95 at Blue Moose Cafe, Pages Bookstore, and www.worthatalk.net.

Forty per cent of net proceeds from each book sale will be donated to the Salvation Army, Focus on the Family, Union Gospel Mission, M2/W2 Prison Ministries, and Ruth and Naomi’s Mission.

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