Thrills, chills and family fun

Magician John Kaplan performs Stage Fright at Hope Secondary.

Halloween and magic go hand in hand and on Oct. 25, Hope residents should be prepared to be amazed as magician John Kaplan presents his Stage Fright showcase.

The fundraising event is being put on by the Hope Mountain Black Bear Committee and proceeds go to support the volunteer work the organization performs.

Lydia Koot, chair of the organization has worked with Kaplan before and realized it would be a great way to entertain people while still raising money for a good cause.

“It’s a Halloween family magic show,” she said. “I’ve seen his other shows so I’m very curious to see his Halloween show.”

According to Koot, as part of the production, Kaplan often takes kids and adults from the audience to come on stage and assist in the illusions.

“It’s really appealing to all age groups.”

The show takes place Oct. 25 at 7 p.m. in the Hope Secondary School gymnasium. Tickets, purchased before Oct. 11 are $10 for adults, $8 for students or $30 for a family of four. After Oct. 11 the price is $12 for adults and $10 for students. Tickets are available at the Hope Vet Clinic, the Blue Moose, Pharmasave, Hub International or by calling 604-869-4558.

Along with the show, a raffle will take place for some great prizes. Tickets will be sold at the show with 12 winners selected. Each winner will receive a key. One of the keys will open a “spooky coffin” filled with prizes.

“It’s just another fun way to raise funds,” said Koot.

There is also a guillotine trick as part of the show. People from the community (teachers, business people and even municipal politicians) are being challenged to collect pledges ahead of time. Whoever gets the most money in pledges, will take part in the “head removing” illusion.

Also, don’t forget to check out the coloring contest inside today’s edition of the hope Standard.

All proceeds go towards the black bear committee which was started last year.

It’s not the official Bear Aware program, it’s all done by volunteers, explained Koot.

She started the program after a huge “increase of bear calls coming into the conservation office.”

When a bear call comes in, volunteers go door-to-door talking to neighbors and educating them on how they can prevent attracting the animals.

They advice people not to leave their garbage out over night and warn them how bird feeders and fruit trees draw bears to the area.

“These actions not only protect us from the bear, but protect the bear from being shot.”

As part of the group’s work, a gleaning program has begun, helping to remove all unwanted fruit from trees. Volunteers, 16 in all, gather the fruit which is processed and donated to charity.