Langley and Abbotsford first responders part of Homeland Security mock disaster event

The fifth Canada-United States Enhanced Resiliency Experiment takes place this week.

Will the technology of emergency responders in Langley and Abbotsford, federal and provincial governments, and US neighbour governments work if Mount Baker’s volcano erupted?

That’s the question being tested in the fifth Canada-U.S. Enhanced Resiliency Experiment (CAUSE V) disaster response exercise Wednesday and Thursday.

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) and Canada Department of National Defence’s Centre for Security Science will conduct the fifth Canada-U.S. Enhanced Resiliency Experiment (CAUSE V) from Nov. 15 to 16, 2017.

In this year’s experiment, emergency management officials and first responder agencies on both sides of the border will test their plans and gear as well as assess cooperation procedures in response to a volcanic eruption and crater collapse scenario at Mt. Baker.

Participants will include local first responders and emergency management agencies from Whatcom County, Washington in the U.S., Abbotsford, U.S. Customs and Border Protection and Canada Border Services Agency.

CAUSE started in 2011 to ensure the two nations could work well together in an emergency. Each time the exercise takes place in a different location to test cross-border communications and interoperability between emergency responders and emergency management agencies on both sides of the border.

As part of the exercise, the volcano has increased activity which prompts the Cascades Volcano Observatory to raise the alert level. The first major earthquake occurs in the subsequent weeks, followed by steam and ash emission. The National Weather Service forecasts river flooding and lahar, which is a destructive flow of volcanic debris. In mid-November, a volcanic eruption of Mt. Baker causes a collapse of the Sherman crater wall and sends lahar down to the valley.

The lahar causes extensive damage in both Washington and B.C., requiring an immediate response from multiple agencies from both sides of the border.

The testing will include the communications networks, social media monitoring, alerts, warning systems, and even aerial robots for damage assessment.

Just Posted

Fraser Valley about to heat up

Temperatures to climb into the low 30s next week

UPDATE: All lanes open after crash closed Sea-to-Sky near Lions Bay

Hwy. 99 not expected to re-open until 2:30 p.m.

BC Lions defensive back Marcell Young levels streaker in home opener

Young hit the fan near one of the 45-yard lines

COLUMN: Senior abuse and neglect — it’s not right!

Recognizing the warning signs on World Elder Abuse Awareness Day

South Surrey sting ends with dropped charges

Shop owner frustrated with outcome after videotaping regular customer

REPLAY: B.C. this week in video

In case you missed it, here’s a look at replay-worthy highlights from across the province this week

B.C. NHL prospect expected to make ‘full recovery’ after an incident in Calgary

Jordy Bellerive was injured in a reported house fire Saturday night

Police: Taxi driver who hit 8 Moscow pedestrians fell asleep

Two Mexican World Cup fans were among those hit

B.C. VIEWS: Orphans of our urban drug culture neglected again

Child advocate Bernard Richard leaves B.C. with harsh message

From marijuana beer to pot cookies, Canadian companies creating cannabis edibles

Manufacturers think that edibles will do well with users who don’t want to smoke or vape

Privacy lawyer warns against victim blaming in recent sextortion scams

Perpetrators get sexual photos of the victim and threaten to share them with friends and families

Motorcycle crash sends man to hospital with life-threatening injuries

Rider collided with a car near Edmonds SkyTrain in Burnaby

QB Jennings leads Lions to 22-10 win over Alouettes

B.C. wins CFL home opener over Montreal

Most Read