Langley and Abbotsford first responders part of Homeland Security mock disaster event

The fifth Canada-United States Enhanced Resiliency Experiment takes place this week.

Will the technology of emergency responders in Langley and Abbotsford, federal and provincial governments, and US neighbour governments work if Mount Baker’s volcano erupted?

That’s the question being tested in the fifth Canada-U.S. Enhanced Resiliency Experiment (CAUSE V) disaster response exercise Wednesday and Thursday.

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) and Canada Department of National Defence’s Centre for Security Science will conduct the fifth Canada-U.S. Enhanced Resiliency Experiment (CAUSE V) from Nov. 15 to 16, 2017.

In this year’s experiment, emergency management officials and first responder agencies on both sides of the border will test their plans and gear as well as assess cooperation procedures in response to a volcanic eruption and crater collapse scenario at Mt. Baker.

Participants will include local first responders and emergency management agencies from Whatcom County, Washington in the U.S., Abbotsford, U.S. Customs and Border Protection and Canada Border Services Agency.

CAUSE started in 2011 to ensure the two nations could work well together in an emergency. Each time the exercise takes place in a different location to test cross-border communications and interoperability between emergency responders and emergency management agencies on both sides of the border.

As part of the exercise, the volcano has increased activity which prompts the Cascades Volcano Observatory to raise the alert level. The first major earthquake occurs in the subsequent weeks, followed by steam and ash emission. The National Weather Service forecasts river flooding and lahar, which is a destructive flow of volcanic debris. In mid-November, a volcanic eruption of Mt. Baker causes a collapse of the Sherman crater wall and sends lahar down to the valley.

The lahar causes extensive damage in both Washington and B.C., requiring an immediate response from multiple agencies from both sides of the border.

The testing will include the communications networks, social media monitoring, alerts, warning systems, and even aerial robots for damage assessment.

Just Posted

Volunteers risk their lives to save others

SAR training prepares them for the job

Many moving parts to economic development

Tourism is only part of the answer

Window art a sign of the season

B.C. artist paints windows across the province

Get all your stocking stuffers, and the stockings, too

Beta Sigma Phi Christmas Craft Sale returns

VIDEO: Fraser Valley Bald Eagle Festival

This year’s event featured six stops, including viewing points and activity centres.

VIDEO: ‘She is a tough cookie,’ says husband of found Coquitlam dog walker

Annette Poitras found alive in the woods on Wednesday morning

BC Transit buses to get safety door for drivers

These new full-length doors will be tested in Victoria, Kelowna and Abbotsford

‘Fresh eyes’ looking into three missing Cowichan Tribes men

First Nations want answers to their disappearances

Pedestrian hit moments after receiving safety reflector from police

The Vancouver Island man was treated for minor injuries by police at the scene

FortisBC LNG site exports first shipment of gas to China

The shipment is part of a pilot project that could see more exports in the future.

BC RCMP hunt for white SUV that rammed cruiser

Kamloops RCMP are looking for a white SUV headed north on the Yellowhead Highway

B.C. to reimburse methadone patients for taking clinic fees off welfare cheques

Provincial government agrees to pay back more than $5.5 million in deducted fees

Police look for Alberta woman believed to be in Lower Mainland

Serenity Rosewell and Jazmine Sleva of Sylvan Lake have been reported missing

Most Read