Dozens of Mission residents have served with the regiment. Here

Westies publishing book of its history

B.C.'s oldest military unit, one in which numerous Mission residents have served, has a territory from Boston Bar to Burnaby

The Royal Westminster Regiment, the oldest active military unit in British Columbia, is extending the deadline for pre-ordering its pictorial history book to Oct. 8.

Numerous Mission residents have served in the regiment over the years, which now has locations in New Westminster and Aldergrove, and its territory spans from Burnaby to Boston Bar.

For King and Country: 150 Years of The Royal Westminster Regiment documents its rich history in a book which will commemorate 150 years of service.

A volunteer book team, coordinated by Sgt. Harley, has assembled a collection of photographs, facts, memorabilia and records, many of which are being published for the first time. The book will be hardcover and printed in full colour.

Public sales will begin Jan. 1, 2013.

The New Westminster Volunteer Rifles, predecessor to The Royal Westminster Regiment, were granted authority by Governor Douglas on Nov. 20, 1863. As a fighting force, the Westies have been involved in every major conflict of the post-Victorian era. The Primary Reserve Light Infantry Battalion has served in the Boer War, World War I and World War II. It has also augmented numerous oversees deployments on UN and NATO missions in Bosnia, Croatia, Cyprus, the Golan Heights, Sierra Leone and Afghanistan. Members are currently serving overseas in Afghanistan and the Sudan. The Westies also have a long history of community support including the New Westminster Great Fire in 1898, the Fraser Valley floods in 1948, the Okanagan wild fires of 2003 and the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games.

To pre-order a book, visit vivalogue.ca.

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