ICBC’s new insurance model, which came into effect Sept. 1, is designed to better reflect the risk associated with those who will be behind the wheel of a vehicle.

New ICBC rate model in effect: What you need to know

Model aims to make car insurance better for BC

If you’re renewing your vehicle insurance today, you’ll likely notice a few changes in the process.

They’re all part of measures ICBC is taking to drive home accountability, which means you will be asked for a little more information when you insure your vehicle.

The new model, which came into effect Sept. 1, is more driver-based to better reflect the risk associated with those who will be behind the wheel, explains Joanna Linsangan.

“It’s all about driver accountability. It means that safer drivers will pay less for their insurance with ICBC and higher-risk drivers will pay more,” she says.

Ready to renew? Here’s what you need to know:

  • The renewal process may be a little more involved under the new model, at least for the first year, so try to allow a little more time, Linsangan suggests. You’ll want to list the drivers who drive your car, and have their driver’s license numbers and date’s of birth on-hand.
  • Think about who you plan to let drive your vehicle. Your rate will be based 75 per cent on the driving record of the person who drives the most and 25 per cent on the record of the highest-risk driver, Linsangan explains.
  • Like private insurers have long done, ICBC will consider multiple and serious driving convictions for infractions like excessive speeding when providing rates for optional coverage. “How we calculate premiums will be heavily weighted on your driving history,” Linsangan says.
  • You may qualify for new discounts. If you have a vehicle with factory installed autonomous emergency braking, you could qualify for a 10 per cent discount, in recognition of the technology’s ability to reduce crashes. Another 10 per cent discount is available for those who drive less frequently or for shorter distances – the low kilometre discount applies to cars driven less than 5,000 kilometres per year. Take a photo of your odometer and you may be eligible at next year’s renewal.

Good news for good drivers

More change is in the works that will reward responsible drivers. While the “safe driver” Basic insurance discount previously recognized only up to 9 years of safe driving, drivers will continue to earn additional savings for up to 40 years of driving.

In addition, if you’ve been driving for 20 years, and have a 10-year crash-free record, if a crash does occur, it will be forgiven without impacting your premiums.

To learn more, visit icbc.com

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