Chilliwack school trustee Barry Neufeld speaking against the B.C. Education Ministry’s SOGI 123 program at a rally called by Culture Guard in Chilliwack in November. (Jessica Peters/Progress file)

Union files human rights complaint over Chilliwack school trustee’s LGBTQ comments

Board and trustee Barry Neufeld facing $50,000 tribunal charge over alleged ‘unsafe work environment’

The union that represents Chilliwack school support workers, custodians, transportation staff and others has filed a complaint to the Human Rights Tribunal.

The complaint, by CUPE 411, is against school trustee Barry Neufeld and the Chilliwack School Board. Back in November, Neufeld began a series of public comments airing his beliefs about transgender policies, gender theories, and family values, in light of the province adopting new teaching resources to address sexual orientation and gender identity in the classroom.

His attitudes, expressed online, in board meetings and in spoken public forums, created “an unsafe work environment for CUPE members and other Board employees” the HRT complaint states, as confirmed by board chair Paul McManus.

The complaint asks for a declatory order that the board has breached the Human Rights Code, and that all trustees and senior management take part in training on LGBTQ equality rights, and on protecting LGBTQ students in schools.

They are also seeking an order to direct the board to enforce their own policy to adopt a motion of censure. In addition, they are asking that a fee of $50,000 in compensation for “injury to dignity, feelings, and self-respect” be paid on behalf of affected employee to a non-profit group that advocates for LGBTQ youth.

The board recieved notice of the complaint on Monday afternoon (Jan. 15), confirmed McManus.

“There’s not a whole lot we can talk about at this point,” he said. “We’ve had to forward it onto legal for advice.”

McManus added that the whole discussion has overshadowed all of the other work the board has had at its table over the past few months, including a massive plan to reconfigure school grades.

“We keep trying to move forward with the other business of the board with all of this in the background,” he said. “But we keep constantly breaking out in these conversations.”

While he says that the conversation around SOGI and inclusion are important, there are certain things people want that the board just can’t do. There are people who oppose Neufeld who want him fired by the board, which is not legally possible, McManus said. On the other hand there are Neufeld supporters who believe schools are involved with gender reassignment surgeries and puberty blockers, which also isn’t factual, he added.

“This all stems from these personal opinions Barry’s thrown out there and we have to deal with as a board because of who he has aligned himself with,” McManus said. In November, Neufeld spoke as a special guest at a Culture Guard rally in Chilliwack. He has also sent out a mass email to his supporters to ask them to email the District Parent Advisory Council chair, Justine Hodge, after the DPAC called for his resignation. He asked his supporters to “challenge her opinions” and suggested Hodge would be running against him in the school board elections in October.

Hodge has never stated an intention to run for school board, and the provincial confederation of PACs has written to support the Chilliwack DPAC’s actions.


@CHWKcommunity
jpeters@theprogress.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Hope school board candidates talk SOGI, successes and rocky patches of past four years

Six candidates are vying for three Hope trustee positions up for grabs in an Oct. 20 election

VIDEO: This is what buying legal pot in B.C. looks like

Take a look inside B.C.’s first and only legal pot shop located in Kamloops

Cindy Young makes second run for top political job at the District of Hope

Young, in her run for mayor, is campaigning to attract business to Hope and keep local youth in the community

10 things still illegal in the new age of recreational cannabis

Pot is legal – but there are still a lot of rules, and breaking some could leave you in jail

One of Chilliwack’s oldest clubs, Toastmasters, hosts an open public speaking event this month

An open house will take place on Oct. 24 at the Mt. Cheam Lions Club Hall at 7:15 p.m.

Mellow opening to B.C.’s only legal pot shop

About five people lined up early for the opening of the BC Cannabis Store in Kamloops.

Black market will thrive until small pot growers and sellers included: advocates

Advocates say the black market will continue to thrive until small retail shops and craft growers are included in the regime.

Goodbye cable, hello Netflix: 1/3 of Canadians cut the cord

Just under half of households no longer have a landline phone

‘Some baloney’ in assertion Canada’s pension fund has highest ethical standards

The Canadian Press Baloney Meter is a dispassionate examination of political statements culminating in a ranking of accuracy on a scale of “no baloney” to “full of baloney”.

In Mexico Beach after Hurricane Michael, some coming home find no home

State emergency management officials said some 124,500 customers across the Panhandle were still without power Wednesday morning and 1,157 remained in shelters.

Man linked to Saudi prince at consulate when writer vanished

Saudi Arabia, which initially called the allegations “baseless,” has not responded to repeated requests for comment from The Associated Press over recent days.

5 to start your day

Cannabis is legalized across B.C., silly election signs pop up in Langley and more

Manhunt in Crimea for possible accomplice in school attack

An 18-year-old student, who later killed himself, was initially believed to be the only one involved

Police hand out a few hefty fines for allegedly violating Cannabis Act

Police in Canada posted a photo of a $215 ticket given to someone who allegedly had a baggy of marijuana in their car

Most Read