Fraser trail network plan gains new park in Surrey

Parsons Channel site newest addition to Experience The Fraser river corridor

Newly acquired parkland in north Surrey along Parsons Channel. The opposite shore across that part of the Fraser River is Barnston Island.

Newly acquired parkland in north Surrey along Parsons Channel. The opposite shore across that part of the Fraser River is Barnston Island.

A 12-acre park being created in Surrey along the Fraser River is the latest piece being dropped into the larger Experience the Fraser project that aims to open a network of contiguous riverside trails from Hope to the Salish Sea.

The forested land on Parsons Channel bought by the City of Surrey includes two fish-bearing creeks and will offer viewpoints overlooking the river.

Surrey Coun. Linda Hepner said the new park, located between 182A Street and Golden Ears Way, will attract people from around the region and provide a key Surrey chunk of the Experience the Fraser vision to “enhance recreation opportunities and create a thriving park system along the river.”

More than 43 per cent of the 550 kilometres of planned trails for Experience the Fraser are already in place, mostly in existing parks or along dykes.

The ultimate vision is for twin trails – dubbed the Canyon to Coast Trail – running on both sides of the river throughout the Lower Mainland, ending in Steveston and the Tsawwassen ferry terminal.

Surrey Bend Regional Park, Westminster Pier Park, the Pitt River greenway and the Matsqui Trail to Fort Langley are expected to be key sections in the 160-kilometre corridor.

Users could take side trips on linking trails into areas like the Kanaka Greenway or Sumas Mountain Regional Park.

Connections with the Sea-to-Sky trail and Trans-Canada trail are also envisioned.

The Experience the Fraser trails would connect heritage and First Nations cultural sites, amenities like campgrounds and other destinations, from museums to farm gate stores.

An initial concept plan was endorsed last fall by the Metro Vancouver and Fraser Valley regional district boards.

The province provided $2.5 million in initial funding to develop the concept plan and help launch two demonstration projects – one on the Mission waterfront and the other a trail through Derby Reach Regional Park between the Golden Ears Bridge and Fort Langley.

Some ideas raised in the plan include self-propelled cable car crossings, “floatels” – floating hotels or bed-and-breakfasts in the river – and a floating event venue on a barge that could move from city to city for celebrations and festivals.

It also suggests developing “experi-turismos” that give visitors hands-on experiences similar to the Italian agriturismo concept.

“Imagine participating in a First Nations’ longhouse and village, working on a pioneer heritage farm, becoming a Royal Engineer for the day, or living at a working Fort,” the plan says.

How the full vision will be funded and governed is to be determined, but a broad partnership that could include the private sector is being pursued.

Inspiration has been drawn from similar trail networks elsewhere in the world, including the Waterfront Trail along Lake Ontario and the St. Clair River, and the $275-million Mountains to Sound greenway in Washington State.

 

Map of how Experience The Fraser trails (red) would mesh with other routes beyond the region.Also download detailed map of Experience the Fraser concept.

Just Posted

Jacqueline Pearce and Jean-Pierre Antonio received the BC Historical Federation Best Article Award on Saturday for their story about translating haiku written in the Tashme internment camp.
Article chronicling haiku in Japanese internment camp near Hope wins award

Tashme Haiku Club’s work was preserved and recently translated, authors write

Kindergarten kids from Evans elementary school in Chilliwack painted rocks with orange hearts and delivered them to Sto:lo Elders Lodge recently after learning about residential schools. (Laura Bridge photo)
Kindergarten class paints rocks with orange hearts in Chilliwack for local elders

‘Compassion and empathy’ being shown by kids learning about residential schools

Chilliwack potter Cathy Terepocki (left) and Indigenous enhancement teachers Val Tosoff (striped top) and Christine Seymour (fuchsia coat), along with students at Vedder middle school, look at some of the 500-plus pinch pots on Thursday, June 10 made by the kids to honour the 215 children found at Kamloops Indian Residential School. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
Chilliwack students make hundreds of tiny clay pots in honour of 215 Indigenous children

‘I think the healing process has begun,’ says teacher about Vedder middle school project

Dennis Saulnier rescued his daughters, two-year-old Brinley (left) and four-year-old Keegan, after their truck was driven off the road and into Cultus Lake on May 16, 2020. Reporter Jenna Hauck has been recognized by the B.C. and Yukon Community Newspapers Association for her story on the rescue. (Jenna Hauck/ The Progress)
Chilliwack Progress, Hope Standard staff take home 7 Ma Murray awards

Jenna Hauck, Eric Welsh, Jessica Peters, Emelie Peacock all earn journalism industry recognition

(Unsplash.com)
Protecting our elders: It’s up to all of us to look out for them

World Elder Abuse Awareness Day (WEAAD) is June 15

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau participates in a plenary session at the G7 Summit in Carbis Bay, England on Friday June 11, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Canada donating 13M surplus COVID-19 vaccine doses to poor countries

Trudeau says the government will pay for 87 million shots to be distributed to poor countries

Premier John Horgan speaks as provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry, right, and health minister Adrian Dix look on during a press conference to update on the province’s fall pandemic preparedness plan during a press conference from the press theatre at Legislature in Victoria, Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
B.C. officials to provide details on Step 2 of COVID reopening plan Monday

Step 2 could allow for larger gatherings and a resumption of recreational travel

Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller is seen during a news conference, Wednesday May 19, 2021 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Indigenous child-welfare battle heads to court despite calls for Ottawa to drop cases

Feds are poised to argue against two Canadian Human Rights Tribunal rulings

The Great Ogopogo Bathtub Race has been held in Summerland as a fundraising event. Do you know which Canadian city introduced this sport? (Black Press file photo)
QUIZ: A summer’s day at the water

How much do you know about boats, lakes and water?

Two-year-old Ivy McLeod laughs while playing with Lucky the puppy outside their Chilliwack home on Thursday, June 10, 2021. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
VIDEO: B.C. family finds ‘perfect’ puppy with limb difference for 2-year-old Ivy

Ivy has special bond with Lucky the puppy who was also born with limb difference

A million-dollar ticket was sold to an individual in Vernon from the Lotto Max draw Friday, June 11, 2021. (Photo courtesy of BCLC)
Lottery ticket worth $1 million sold in Vernon

One lucky individual holds one of 20 tickets worth $1 million from Friday’s Lotto Max draw

“65 years, I’ve carried the stories in my mind and live it every day,” says Jack Kruger. (Athena Bonneau)
‘Maybe this time they will listen’: Survivor shares stories from B.C. residential school

Jack Kruger, living in Syilx territory, wasn’t surprised by news of 215 children’s remains found on the grounds of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School

A logging truck carries its load down the Elaho Valley near in Squamish, B.C. in this file photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chuck Stoody
Squamish Nation calls for old-growth logging moratorium in its territory

The nation says 44% of old-growth forests in its 6,900-square kilometre territory are protected while the rest remain at risk

Most Read