A new funding stream will allow the Hope and Area Transition Society to better assist survivors of sexualized violence. (Shutterstock photo)

A new funding stream will allow the Hope and Area Transition Society to better assist survivors of sexualized violence. (Shutterstock photo)

Hope and Area Transition Society expanding assistance for survivors of sexualized violence

A 22-month project aims to better deliver community-based emergency sexualized violence response

The Hope and Area Transition Society (H.A.T.S.) is expanding their Sexualized Violence Response Program.

H.A.T.S. has received funding from the Ending Violence Association of BC (EVA BC), in collaboration with the Ministry of Public Safety and Solicitor General.

The funding will help H.A.T.S. launch a 22-month project that aims to better deliver community-based emergency sexualized violence response services that are trauma informed and culturally appropriate. Support will be available throughout the region — from Agassiz, Harrison and Sts-ailes in the west, to Boston Bar and Boothroyd in the north, east to Manning Park and communities along Highway 1 to Popkum.

“Giving survivors options to help them navigate these complex systems, is long overdue in the region,” said Gerry Dyble, Executive Director at H.A.T.S “By enhancing our current domestic violence support programs though this funding stream we can diversify the opportunities for families, women, children, men and non-binary folks. This will sustain a path to healing that works for them.”

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The focus of the program will be on improving access to health, justice, and community support services.

If survivors are better served by a coordinated and cross-sector response, H.A.T.S. hopes that will lead to an increase in reporting of sexualized violence incidents. A large component of the project will be education, awareness and advocacy.

“Having the program be accessed through our transition house allows for 24/7 monitoring and services to hopefully close some of the gaps we have seen in the community” said Anna Gladue, Program Coordinator at the Jean Scott Transition House in Hope. “Our staff are trained and ready to help. It’s nice to get the funding for such important work that has been done off the sides of our desks for five to six years now.

“We are ready to hit the ground running.”

Founded in 1994, the Hope and Area Transition Society provides prevention and outreach through four broad streams of service. With over 30 programs and a staff of over 60, they are the largest non-profit in the eastern Fraser Valley.


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