Hope, meet your mayoral candidates

Q&A with candidates Peter Robb, Wilfried Vicktor and Cindy Young

District of Hope mayoral candidates Q&A

Peter Robb

Mayoral candidate Peter Robb. Submitted photo

What experience do you have that makes you suited to be Mayor of the District of Hope?

I bring nine years of council experience to the table, ten years of corporate mid-management and owning and operating a business for seventeen years with over 100 employees. I have served the community by participating on committees, boards and service clubs.

What are the two most pressing issues facing the District of Hope? If elected, how do you plan to address them? (be specific)

Housing affordability for all segments of the community and a viable cost-effective plan that supports new development and replacing aging infrastructure.

A) Housing: Build on current housing successes and form a community task force to work with the province and relevant local agencies to develop a diverse realistic housing plan. Update land use plan for promoting and identifying viable options for development.

B) Infrastructure: Work with district staff to update any plan to forecast future needs and ongoing replacement. Need a balanced and realistic approach to the districts budget process to support a strong infrastructure plan. New infrastructure is the key to any economic growth opportunity in under-serviced areas.

What is your vision for the District of Hope in the next decade?

My vision is that Hope will be a vibrant and active community based on sustainable and environmentally friendly economic development, with a strong workforce, diverse housing and senior care in place.

In your opinion, what is the role of a Mayor?

To take a leadership role at the council table and set direction to ensure that we provide a safe, healthy and economically sound community. Be an active, respectful listener to understand different perspectives. Promote the district at every opportunity as a place to live, work and play.

Wilfried Vicktor (incumbent)

Incumbent Mayor Wilfried Vicktor. Submitted photo

What experience do you have that makes you suited to be Mayor of the District of Hope?

I have been fortunate to have been elected three terms as mayor (10 years) over the last 22 years and I’m the current incumbent. In addition, I have served two terms on school board and one on council before my terms as mayor. I have been told that I am very effective at bringing together the council team and I believe the last four years of community progress proves that point.

What are the two most pressing issues facing the District of Hope? If elected, how do you plan to address them? (be specific)

Two of the most pressing issues facing Hope include infrastructure maintenance and replacement (roads, water and sewer) and housing availability for middle- to lower-income families. As the current mayor, I have worked with this council to boldly tackle needed upgrades including a rebuilt sewage treatment plant and numerous road replacement projects including Rupert Street, 6 Avenue and Kawkawa Lake Road. In addition, we have an asset management plan which clearly identifies needs for the future so we can budget accordingly.

Significant progress has been made during this council term for housing with the approval of two large affordable housing projects (over 80 units) and tasteful densification in our existing neighborhoods.

What is your vision for the District of Hope in the next decade?

As a district, we should strive to continue to keep our finances in check (last four years at two per cent per annum increase in the municipal budget) and ensure the attraction of new residents of all age groups. Housing opportunities will continue to be enhanced and this additional housing availability combined with a continued business-friendly council and staff will ensure healthy business growth and many more jobs.

In your opinion, what is the role of a Mayor?

The role of Mayor is the facilitation of council meetings and bringing out the best in the six councillors at the table. The mayor must be a strong advocate for Hope and make sure the taxpayers get maximum value for their hard-earned tax dollars. Communicating effectively with the media, other communities and provincial and federal government authorities is another key duty of the mayor.

Cindy Young

Mayoral candidate Cindy Young. Emelie Peacock/Hope Standard

What experience do you have that makes you suited to be Mayor of the District of Hope?

I own a small business, but at the same time I was involved in my father’s company as a shareholder. Plus, was also involved in running other companies, which was a must in my father’s company. You have to run a town like a business and treat it as such.

2. What are the two most pressing issues facing the District of Hope? If elected, how do you plan to address them? (be specific)

Most important is aging infrastructure and jobs. First to go over the plans and see which is in need of our first consideration to be updated. Jobs, we need to look at more global opportunities to bring new business here.

3. What is your vision for the District of Hope in the next decade?

To see more positive change in business and growth. To make it more inviting and for people to actually stay instead of using us as a pit stop.

4. In your opinion, what is the role of a Mayor?

The role of mayor is to be able to do the right thing. To be able to say the hard line if it comes down to it. Be there for people and what will benefit the town and the people.


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