A group of protesters opposed to COVID-19 restrictions marches past English Bay, in Vancouver, on Sunday, April 26, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

A group of protesters opposed to COVID-19 restrictions marches past English Bay, in Vancouver, on Sunday, April 26, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Individualistic mindset of West comes through in protests against COVID measures

A demonstration in Toronto led Ontario Premier Doug Ford to call the participants ‘a bunch of yahoos’

The photos were circulating on social media all week.

A man in Pittsburgh dressed in a George Washington mask holding what appeared to be a semi-automatic weapon. A woman in Denver leering out her car window as a front-line health care worker tried to block her path.

Protests against stay-at-home orders that can halt the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic are popping up nearly daily in the United States, with some spilling into Canada, too.

A demonstration in Toronto on Saturday led Ontario Premier Doug Ford to call the participants “a bunch of yahoos.” A similar protest against coronavirus restrictions happened in Vancouver days earlier.

READ MORE: Wage subsidy program opens for applications as businesses struggle amid pandemic

While the majority of Americans and Canadians seem to be adhering to lockdown measures, experts in sociology, political science and history aren’t surprised to see a recent rise in protests.

Alison Meek, an associate professor of American history at Western University in London, Ont., says the U.S. in particular — a country “born out of rebellion” — has historically taken issue with allowing the federal government too much power.

“I see in this very much that individualistic spirit of Americans and that goes right back to the founding of the country,” Meek said. ”They’re not going to listen to the federal government. They don’t believe in that authority.”

While the U.S. has been no stranger to public protests in the past, Meek said there’s more to these pandemic-related demonstrations, including economic factors and ”a real anti-science, anti-expert component.”

“Every expert is saying you need to do the social distancing, you’ve got to flatten the curve. And there is a real sense from a lot of Americans of: ‘you can’t tell us what to do,’” she said. “They’re going to just listen to their own instincts. They’re going to listen to what they see on Facebook or Twitter or whatever social media they’re following.

“So I think it’s just this confluence of stuff that’s coming into play. … and the misinformation that’s out there is making this so much worse than it should be.”

Multiple protests broke out across the U.S. last week, including in Vermont, Virginia, Wisconsin and California, with most of them organized via social media.

A private Facebook group was key in enlisting people for a “Liberate Minnesota” march outside the governor’s home last Friday, and U.S. President Donald Trump backed the protesters on Twitter, calling to “LIBERATE MINNESOTA” right before it happened.

“Trump is that ultimate populist,” Meek said. “When his own experts are saying X, and he comes in and says, ’no, no, no we’re going to do Y,’ that shows even he doesn’t trust his own experts.

“He is this quintessential I’m going to trust my feelings type of guy. … And that trickles down to his supporters, like: ‘why should we trust the PhDs in virology and microbiology?’”

The protests around the U.S. and Canada have been relatively small — roughly 100 people participated in the Toronto demonstration over the weekend and a police spokeswoman said the crowd adhered to physical distancing rules after it was requested.

Still, Max Cameron, a political science professor at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, said he’s been “appalled” by some of the images he’s seen of the protests, specifically in the U.S.

“But I don’t think I can tell you I’m surprised,” he added. “When the President is sending out tweets, encouraging people to liberate their states and tapping into that states-rights rhetoric, that gives political cover to what they’re doing.”

Cameron sees a disjointed message between policy makers and politicians in the U.S., where different cities or counties within states may have their own rules for physical distancing and business closures.

And that could be sparking some of these protests.

“What we know from studies in public opinion is the public is more likely to be divided if elected officials are divided,” Cameron said. ”But if the political class is relatively unified, society will tend to unify behind what the messages are from our elected officials.”

READ MORE: B.C. will ‘have to find a way’ for families to visit seniors in longterm care: advocate

Zohreh BayatRizi, an associate professor of sociology at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, believes the downturn of the economy is likely playing another major role in the protests.

She said the rollout for government assistance hasn’t gone that smoothly in some parts of the U.S., leading to a conflict between what people are being told to do and their ability to stay economically viable.

But BayatRizi, who’s an expert in the sociology of mortality, sees another layer to the demonstrations.

“It can be hard for people, especially younger people, to think that something fatal won’t impact them, so there’s a sense of being immune or invulnerable,” BayatRizi said, adding that early descriptions of the virus as one that affected mostly older people didn’t help sway that point of view.

“When you’re talking about all those people (protesting) out there, the pictures I am seeing are of younger people or middle aged people, not ones who are much older.”

Cameron said that while images of protests have been hard to see for people adhering to physical distancing themselves, it’s important to remember that these demonstrations are depicting a minority.

He said the bigger picture is the “unprecedented collective action” being done to limit the pandemic’s spread.

“You’d have to go back to war time to find a time when so many people have been asked to sacrifice so much for the greater good,” he said. ”We’re not being asked to go off to war fortunately, we’re just being asked to stay home.

“And the idea that millions and millions of people are doing the same thing in an effort to achieve the common good is a testament to the capacity of good democracies to really get things done.”

Melissa Couto, The Canadian Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Coronavirus

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

An original piece of artwork by Rosie Laponder, was stolen along with various art supplies from Julie Ann’s Art and Custom Framing in Chilliwack on Nov. 28, 2020. (Submitted image)
Thieves steal original artwork, art supplies from Chilliwack store

‘It kind of makes you sick to your stomach,’ says store manager

The paraglider pilot, while attempting to free himself, dropped 30 feet and sustained serious injuries as Kent-Harrison Search and Rescue members worked quickly to extract him from the trees. They were able to get him to a waiting ambulance at the end of a nearby forest service road. (Contributed Photo/Dave Harder)
Lower Mainland Search and Rescue saves paraglider in treetop rescue

Pilot tried to self-rescue but sustained serious injuries in a 30-foot fall

Still from a video surveillance camera of a man alleged to have stolen from several people at knife-point in Chilliwack (Rosedale) early on Nov. 28, 2020. (Facebook)
Violent crime spree involving knife ends in arrest in Chilliwack

RCMP looking for footage that captures violent crime spree in Chilliwack

A screenshot of a poster detailing a Dec. 4 protest against Hope council’s decision to reject BC Housing’s rezoning application for 650 Old Hope Princeton Way. (Submitted photo)
Protest planned following Hope council’s veto on supportive housing

Council voted 4 opposed, 1 in support, of BC Housing’s plans to rezone 650 Old Hope Princeton Way

Hope Secondary School. (Emelie Peacock/Hope Standard)
Update: Fourth COVID-19 exposure at Hope Secondary School confirmed

Hope high school the only school in Fraser Cascade to experience multiple exposures

A B.C. Ambulance Service paramedic wearing a face mask to curb the spread of COVID-19 moves a stretcher outside an ambulance at Royal Columbia Hospital, in New Westminster, B.C., on Sunday, November 29, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
B.C. records deadliest weekend of COVID-19 pandemic with 46 deaths; more than 2,300 cases

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry provides COVID-19 update

Fossil finds at Mt. Stephen. (Photo: Sarah Fuller/Parks Canada)
Extreme hiking, time travel and science converge in the Burgess Shale

Climb high in the alpine and trace your family tree back millions of years – to our ocean ancestors

Menno Place. (Google Street View image.)
32 family members respond to Abbotsford care home’s plea for staffing help during COVID-19 outbreak

Menno Home asks for relief workers for food service, laundry and housekeeping

Kettle bells sit aligned in an indoor fitness studio. (PIxabay.com)
1 COVID-19 case at a B.C. fitness studio leads to 104 more infections, 6 school exposures

According to case data released by Fraser Health, one case of the novel coronavirus carries a big impact

Vehicles drive past a display thanking essential workers in Burnaby, B.C. on Sunday, Nov. 29, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Marissa Tiel
B.C. changing COVID-19 case reporting as virus spread continues

Manual counting takes more time, leads to errors

Black Press Media and BraveFace have come together to support children facing life-threatening conditions. Net proceeds from these washable, reusable, three-layer masks go to Make-A-Wish Foundation BC & Yukon.
Put on a BraveFace: Mask fundraiser helps make children’s wishes come true

From Black Press Media + BraveFace – adult, youth and kid masks support Make-A-Wish Foundation

Christy Jordan-Fenton is the co-author of the book Fatty Legs, which has been mentioned amid the controversy of an Abbotsford school assignment on residential schools.
Co-author of residential schools book condemns controversial Abbotsford class assignment

Children’s book mentioned amid controversy at W. A. Fraser Middle School

Kootenay East MLA Tom Shypitka takes over as energy and mines critic for the B.C. Liberal opposition. Kelowna-Lake Country MLA Norm Letnick (right) moves from health critic to assistant deputy speaker. (Hansard TV)
B.C. Liberals pick critics to take on Horgan’s NDP majority

Interim leader Shirley Bond takes seniors, long-term care

B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver. (Black Press Media files)
Judge hears Langley development case that could end in mayor, councillors booted out of council

The conflict of interest case was launched by local voters a year ago

Most Read