New housing in Hope opened to new residents on July 2, 2021. (Submitted by Province of B.C.)

New housing in Hope opened to new residents on July 2, 2021. (Submitted by Province of B.C.)

New affordable homes open for Indigenous peoples in Hope

Apartment building and townhouses help fill a need for local housing, says mayor

The Riverstone in Hope is now open.

People began moving into the Indigenous housing on July 2. The project is a partnership between the Province, the Aboriginal Housing Management Association (AHMA) and Mamele’awt Qweesome Housing Society (MQHS).

“We know how much these homes are needed for Indigenous families and individuals in Hope,” said David Eby, Attorney General and Minister Responsible for Housing. “Indigenous housing projects like this are starting to open their doors in communities throughout the province, and that’s thanks to the hard work of partners like AHMA and Mamele’awt Qweesome Housing Society. Our hope is the federal government follows our lead in funding new Indigenous housing across the province.”

Located at 755 Old Hope Princeton Way, the project provides 45 homes for Indigenous families, elders and individuals, including a 37-unit apartment building and eight townhouse units. All units have rents geared to income, with tenants paying no more than 30 per cent of gross household income toward rent. The project is targeted to those with moderate and low incomes, with priority given to Indigenous applicants.

Mamele’awt Qweesome Housing Society (MQHS) operates the development, named the Riverstone.

“MQHS is so excited to open operations in the District of Hope and looks forward to bringing 45 units of much-needed Indigenous housing to the community,” said Janice Silver, chief executive officer, Mamele’awt Qweesome Housing Society. “The Riverstone will be a wonderful place for residents to have a sense of community and enjoy family life.”

Mayor Peter Robb welcomed Mamel’awt Qweesome Housing Society as a new and valued member of the community.

“The housing it will provide is clearly needed, and it is reassuring to know that there are government and non-profit societies that are undertaking this important work with us,” he said.

Mamele’awt Qweesome Housing Society provided the land for the project, valued at approximately $1 million. The Province provided a $9-million grant for the project through the Building BC: Indigenous Housing Fund and is providing annual operating funding of up to about $485,000.

Including these homes, there are more than 1,100 Indigenous Housing Fund homes completed or underway in 26 communities throughout B.C.

READ MORE: Hope affordable housing development to open in June


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