Garry Reece of Lax Kw'alaams First Nation presents cedar bark hat to Premier Christy Clark as Aboriginal Relations Minister John Rustad looks on at revenue sharing ceremony at the B.C. legislature April 9. It was the latest of a long series of B.C. resource revenue agreements

Ottawa follows B.C.’s treaty ‘stepping stones’

Incremental and resource agreements a way forward on stalled aboriginal title talks, federal government comes on board

VICTORIA – The federal government has responded to the strengthening of aboriginal title in B.C. by following the province’s lead and focusing on resource use agreements rather than full-scale treaties that have been slow and expensive to negotiate.

A shift in federal policy was announced Monday by Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Minister Bernard Valcourt, endorsing non-treaty and incremental treaty agreements such as B.C. has focused on in recent years.

Valcourt also appointed Vancouver lawyer Doug Eyford as a special advisor, to follow up on his advice to Ottawa last fall on developing West Coast oil and gas export projects.

B.C. Aboriginal Relations Minister John Rustad welcomed the change in federal approach, describing resource agreements as “stepping stones to reconciliation.

“We had been hoping the federal government would come to the table with things like our non-treaty agreements and our incremental approach to treaty for quite a few years,” Rustad said in an interview Tuesday. “That has been something they’ve resisted, but now they’re going to come to the table with that, and we welcome that.”

B.C. recently signed its first liquefied natural gas resource sharing agreement for facilities proposed near Prince Rupert. On July 11, B.C. reached its 150th forest resource sharing agreement with the Seabird Island Band in the Fraser Valley, and has developed similar revenue deals for mining and hydroelectric projects.

Ottawa is also promising to restart fisheries talks that have been on hold since the Cohen Commission reported in 2012 on the health of Fraser River sockeye salmon runs. The B.C. Treaty Commission has protested for years that Ottawa’s foot-dragging has contributed to the slow pace of talks, with only four treaties completed since the three-way structure was set up in 1992.

Chief Commissioner Sophie Pierre has warned of over-emphasis on resource agreements, with Ottawa and B.C. focused on northern B.C. pipeline and energy projects. Rustad said there are resource projects all over the province that can benefit, adding there will be new agreements announced in the near future.

Valcourt’s announcement mirrors the main recommendations of Eyford’s report last fall. It called for “targeted efforts to build effective relationships, including refinements to Canada’s current approach to consultation and engagement, to explore mutually beneficial initiatives that support reconciliation, and to encourage aboriginal communities to resolve shared territory issues.”

Rustad said Ottawa is moving on Eyford’s recommendations, not in response to the landmark aboriginal title case decided in favour of the Tsilhqot’in Nation in June. The Supreme Court of Canada upheld Tsilhqot’in title to the Nemiah Valley west of Williams Lake, striking down provincial logging permits issued without aboriginal consent.

 

Just Posted

UPDATE: ‘Spontaneous combustion’ likely cause of fire at mushroom composting facility on Lougheed Highway

First responders were at the blaze near the Skawahlook First Nation Tuesday

Approval for AirBnB-style rentals in Kent delayed after public hearing

Staff will be taking the bylaw amendments back for a closer look before final adoption

Trial dates set for three men accused of 2017 killing near Hope

Lawyers for the accused appeared in Kelowna at B.C. Supreme Court on Monday

Abbotsford council OKs bus-to-SkyTrain plan

Fraser Valley Express would begin running to Lougheed Station by start of 2021

Wildfire threatens weekend campers at Chehalis Lake

The fire started on the north side of Chehalis Lake Saturday

VIDEO: Tributes flow on 10th anniversary of Michael Jackson’s death

Jackson received a fatal dose of the anesthetic propofol on June 25, 2009. He died at age 50

VIDEO: Killer whale steals fisherman’s catch off North Coast

Fishing duel results in eager orca snagging salmon in Prince Rupert

40 cats surrendered in apparent hoarding at B.C. home

Officers found the cats living among piles of garbage and feces, suffering from fleas

Tsilhqot’in Nation urges Taseko Mines to stop drilling plans before conflict grows

Nation said Teztan Biny area is of ‘profound cultural and spiritual importance’

Vancouver Aquarium drops cetacean ban lawsuit in new lease agreement

Ocean Wise CEO Lasse Gustavsson called the updated lease an exciting new chapter for the aquarium

Plane veers off runway, into ditch at Langley Airport

Fire, ambulance, and police are on scene

Okanagan RCMP bike patrol rolls up on alleged stolen vehicle from Burnaby

The driver, a 30-year-old Kelowna man, has been held in custody and is facing possible charges of possession of stolen property and obstructing a police officer

Mother of NHLer Carey Price elected chief of B.C. First Nation

Lynda Price previously served as chief of Ulkatcho First Nation from 2005-2009

Man arrested after pimping investigation in Whistler

A 44-year-old man has been charged with procuring and benefiting from sexual services

Most Read