Rescuers from Delta’s Orphaned Wildlife Rehabilitation Society (OWL) cut a young bald eagle from a volleyball net used to save the bird from a sewage treatment settling pond in Richmond, B.C. on Saturday, Aug. 24, 2019. (Orphaned Wildlife Rehabilitation Society/YouTube video screenshot)

VIDEO: B.C. raptor rehab group rescues bald eagle from sewage treatment pond

Delta’s Orphaned Wildlife Rehabilitation Society posted video of the rescue on social media

A volleyball net, a front-end loader, a firetruck and 600 feet of marine rope.

That’s what Delta’s Orphaned Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre (OWL) used to rescue a juvenile bald eagle that was stuck in a water treatment settling pond in Richmond. OWL posted video of the rescue, which took place on Saturday, Aug. 24, to its social media channels earlier this week.

On Saturday, Aug. 24, a Good Samaritan called OWL to report the young eagle was stuck in a settling pond at the Iona Island Waste Treatment Plant. The bird had landed on the muddy surface of the pond and its feathers soon became clogged with sludge, rendering it unable to fly away.

“The bird was trapped on a patch of vegetation — if he stepped off he would start to sink, having to breaststroke back to the island of vegetation,” OWL wrote on Facebook.

SEE ALSO: Helping birds a passion for staff at Delta’s OWL rehabilitation centre

Rescuers had few options to help the bird; safety restrictions meant boats and people are not allowed in the settling pond, and using a helicopter was out of the questions since the pond is located within Vancouver International Airport’s restricted airspace.

What’s more, the treatment plant’s crane wasn’t long enough to help either, as its 18 metre reach was not enough to get to the eagle 40 metres away.

OWL staff and volunteers came up with a plan to suspend a 10-metre volleyball net between a Richmond fire truck and the treatment plant’s front-end loader, then “drive” the net to the patch of vegetation the eagle was clinging to in the hope the bird would get caught up in it and could then be pulled to shore.

Once the eagle was reeled in, rescuers cut the bird free and brought it back to OWL’s facility in South Delta for medical treatment and rehabilitation. Thankfully, aside from being weak and hungry, the eagle’s only injuries were some minor scrapes.

The young eagle was fed salmon and kept in OWL’s intensive care unit for a number of days for further observations and cleaning before being released back into the wild on Tuesday, Sept. 17.

Watch OWL’s full 23-minute video of the eagle’s rescue and rehabilitation below.

SEE ALSO: PHOTOS: Hundreds flock to OWL open house



editor@northdeltareporter.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

Rescuers from Delta’s Orphaned Wildlife Rehabilitation Society (OWL) clean and examine a young bald eagle the group rescued from a sewage treatment settling pond in Richmond, B.C. on Saturday, Aug. 24, 2019. (Orphaned Wildlife Rehabilitation Society/YouTube video screenshot)

Rescuers from Delta’s Orphaned Wildlife Rehabilitation Society (OWL) clean and examine a young bald eagle the group rescued from a sewage treatment settling pond in Richmond, B.C. on Saturday, Aug. 24, 2019. (Orphaned Wildlife Rehabilitation Society/YouTube video screenshot)

Rescuers from Delta’s Orphaned Wildlife Rehabilitation Society (OWL) feed salmon chunks to a young bald eagle the group rescued from a sewage treatment settling pond in Richmond, B.C. on Saturday, Aug. 24, 2019. (Orphaned Wildlife Rehabilitation Society/YouTube video screenshot)

A young bald eagle was released back into the wild on Tuesday, Sept. 17 after staff and volunteers from Delta’s Orphaned Wildlife Rehabilitation Society (OWL) rescued the bird from a sewage treatment settling pond in Richmond, B.C. on Saturday, Aug. 24, 2019. (Orphaned Wildlife Rehabilitation Society/YouTube video screenshot)

Just Posted

UPDATE: Jack-knifed semi closes Coquihalla northbound

A red liquid is reportedly spilled down the side of Highway 5

Teacher salaries, special needs dominate SD78 budget talks

Fraser Cascade has been dipping into reserves to make up teacher salaries

White Rock woman seeks fellow hockey players for BC 55+ Games

Sue Rittinger aiming to put Zone 3 women’s team together in time for September event

Slideshow: Hope’s winter weather in photos

Readers submit photos of Hope under a blanket of snow

Borrow $8 billion for Fraser Valley rail link, Abbotsford mayor urges province

Henry Braun urges province to borrow billions to connect Abbotsford & Chilliwack to Metro Vancouver

VIDEO: ‘Porn’ answer was a wrong one for Surrey family on ‘Feud’ game show

Surrey’s Rams competed on the TV show Wednesday night

VIDEO: Uber, Lyft approved for ride-hailing in Lower Mainland

Kater Technologies Inc.’s application was rejected

Abandoned boats left to freeze on Okanagan Lake cause chaos

Over the last week weather conditions have caused three separate incidents

B.C. teacher witnesses coronavirus terror in Shanghai: ‘Everyone is on edge’

Face masks and hand sanitizer ‘sell out’ as 9 SARS-like illness cases confirmed in the city

B.C.-based firefighting plane crashes in Australia, killing three

Three people are confirmed dead in the crash in New South Wales

VIDEO: Man attacked with pipe in apparent SkyTrain fare gate dispute

Transit police looking for suspect after Jan. 14 attack at Main Street-Science World Station

B.C. youth sentenced for selling fatal dose of MDMA to girl, 13

Sale was made at a New Westminster SkyTrain station in 2017

Living near major roads linked to higher risk of dementia, Parkinson’s: UBC study

Green space could mitigate some of the risks, researchers found

Most Read