Snow plowing is ‘less than optimal’

There is a cost to snow removal, but a less than good job is a waste of time and money

Re: Snow removal needs improvement, Letters (Jan. 25)

This is another view of the snow clearing process in Hope.

After reading the letter from Ray Scott, I feel it necessary to add to his views.

I have lived in a number of cities where plowing has ranged from excellent (Saskatoon), to mediocre (Ottawa), to poor (Carstairs, AB).

Hope plowing can be likened to Ottawa where driveways are plowed in with wet compacted snow, with multiple runs around corners plowing even more snow into the first driveway “downstream” of the corner.

I had to buy a snow blower in Ottawa and at the time I was not 66. I am now, and I am faced with the prospect of buying another just to cope with the snow, and for the same reason.

Due to the last plow “visit” and three runs around the same corner, I now have to use two wrist straps and pain-killers for a time.

It is fortunate that I have a neighbour willing to clear my driveway and those of others, but I cannot expect him to do so. Since the snow that is driven into my driveway is always high enough and deep enough to preclude driveway use, I have a safety issue with this.

We get a good four times more snow pushed into the driveway than does anyone else. I expect that other corner lots have the same issue.

I realize that this year’s snow was “dumped” in just a few days, but this is no excuse for single lane residential streets due to, in my view, less than optimal plowing. The “plow line” in my case is about 10 feet out from the curb. This means I am clearing the street in order to have driveway access.

The nearest hydrant to us has a marker strapped to it, but no access to it. This really is a safety issue.

We try to keep the storm drains clear, but to no avail. Each plow run buries them in yet more snow, and Hope does not clear them.

I realize there is a cost to snow removal, but a less than good job is a waste of time and money and indicates a total lack of respect for the well-being of taxpayers, many of whom are retired.

James Smith