Indigenous reconcilliation

Janet Austin, lieutenant governor of British Columbia stands by a canoe carved by former lieutenant governor Steven Point. The canoe named Shxwtitostel (pronounced: Schwe-tea-tos-tel) means “a safe place to cross the river” in Halq’eméylem and is currently on display at the B.C. Legislature building. (Office of the Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia photo)

New award launched to celebrate champions of reconciliation in B.C.

Reconciliation Award launched by Lieutenant Governor, BC Achievement Foundation

 

James Taylor, a member of the Mississauga Ojibwe Nation, will set out on Sept. 20 to walk from Hope back home to Greater Victoria in just five days to honour survivors of trauma and to acknowledge those who never came home. (Devon Bidal/News Staff)

‘Each step is a prayer’: Ojibwe man will walk from Hope to Vancouver Island for Indigenous healing, reconciliation

James Taylor departs Sept. 20, returns to Saanich in five days for sacred fire

 

Minister of Environment and Climate Change Jonathan Wilkinson speaks to media during the Liberal cabinet retreat at the Fairmont Hotel in Winnipeg, Sunday, Jan. 19, 2020.They blighted Indigenous lives for more than a century. Now their creation is being formally recognized as one of the events that helped shape today’s Canada The federal government has put residential schools on the official roster of National Historic Events. Two of the schools, one in Nova Scotia and one in Manitoba, have been named National Historic Sites — the first in Canada to be so marked. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Mike Sudoma

Sites to be commemorated: Residential schools recognized as ‘historic event’

Doing so was one of the recommendations from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission

 

People shouted in protest and cheered in joy as the Sir John A. Macdonald statue was removed from Victoria’s City Hall on Aug. 11, 2018 (Nicole Crescenzi/News Staff)

City of Victoria considers donating Sir John A. Macdonald statue to province

In a budget meeting Mayor and Council discussed options for the controversial statue

People shouted in protest and cheered in joy as the Sir John A. Macdonald statue was removed from Victoria’s City Hall on Aug. 11, 2018 (Nicole Crescenzi/News Staff)