spy

FILE - Car passes the building of the Federal Security Service (FSB, Soviet KGB successor) in Lubyanskaya Square in Moscow, Russia, on Monday, July 24, 2017. Russia’s top security agency says a reporter for the Wall Street Journal has been arrested on espionage charges. The Federal Security Service (FSB), the top KGB successor agency, said Thursday, March 30, 2023 that Evan Gershkovich was detained in the Ural Mountains city of Yekaterinburg while allegedly trying to obtain classified information. (AP Photo, File)

Russia arrests Wall Street Journal reporter on spying charge

Evan Gershkovich detained in Yekaterinburg, accused of trying to obtain classified information

 

The U.S. military detected and shot down an unidentified aerial object Friday near Alaska’s border with Canada. (AP Digital Embed)

US jets down 4 objects in 8 days, unprecedented in peacetime

A U.S. fighter jet shot down an “unidentified object” over Lake Huron…

 

In this photo provided by Chad Fish, the remnants of a large balloon drift above the Atlantic Ocean, just off the coast of South Carolina, with a fighter jet and its contrail seen below it, Feb. 4, 2023. China on Thursday, Feb. 9, 2023, said U.S. accusations that a downed Chinese balloon was part of an extensive surveillance program amount to “information warfare against China.” (Chad Fish via AP, File)

US says Chinese military behind vast aerial spy program

Americans refute China’s persistent denials that shot-down balloon was used for spying

 

A high altitude balloon floats over Billings, Mont., on Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2023. The U.S. is tracking a suspected Chinese surveillance balloon that has been spotted over U.S. airspace for a couple days, but the Pentagon decided not to shoot it down due to risks of harm for people on the ground, officials said Thursday, Feb. 2, 2023. The Pentagon would not confirm that the balloon in the photo was the surveillance balloon. (Larry Mayer/The Billings Gazette via AP)

China: Balloon over US skies is for research, wind pushed it

U.S. had no immediate response to the Chinese explanation

A high altitude balloon floats over Billings, Mont., on Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2023. The U.S. is tracking a suspected Chinese surveillance balloon that has been spotted over U.S. airspace for a couple days, but the Pentagon decided not to shoot it down due to risks of harm for people on the ground, officials said Thursday, Feb. 2, 2023. The Pentagon would not confirm that the balloon in the photo was the surveillance balloon. (Larry Mayer/The Billings Gazette via AP)
A high-altitude balloon floats over Billings, Mont., on Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2023. The Department of National Defence says Canada is working with the United States to protect sensitive information from foreign intelligence threats after a high-altitude surveillance balloon was detected. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP, Larry Mayer/The Billings Gazette

Canada says NORAD tracking high-altitude surveillance balloon detected over the U.S.

Pentagon says it decided not to shoot it down over concerns of hurting people on the ground

A high-altitude balloon floats over Billings, Mont., on Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2023. The Department of National Defence says Canada is working with the United States to protect sensitive information from foreign intelligence threats after a high-altitude surveillance balloon was detected. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP, Larry Mayer/The Billings Gazette
A woman uses her computer keyboard in North Vancouver, B.C., on December, 19, 2012. A new academic analysis has identified at least 75 foreign digital operations of a malicious political or industrial nature directed at Canada since 2010 – from attempts to steal COVID-19-related research to the targeting of Uyghur human rights activists. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Dozens of cyberespionage operations perpetrated against Canada since 2010: study

Information technology, energy, finance and aerospace industries frequent targets

A woman uses her computer keyboard in North Vancouver, B.C., on December, 19, 2012. A new academic analysis has identified at least 75 foreign digital operations of a malicious political or industrial nature directed at Canada since 2010 – from attempts to steal COVID-19-related research to the targeting of Uyghur human rights activists. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
The tombstone of Gilles Brunet is seen in a Montreal cemetery on Friday, December 10, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

Inside the CSIS probe that identified a Canadian mole who spied for Moscow

CSIS determined that Gilles Germain Brunet was an agent of the Soviet KGB from the late 1960s into the 1970s

The tombstone of Gilles Brunet is seen in a Montreal cemetery on Friday, December 10, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson
THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Security intelligence expert Wesley Wark poses at the University of Ottawa’s Social Sciences Building in Ottawa, Tuesday, May 14, 2013. The Trudeau government is looking at ways to pry open Canada’s neglected national-security vaults, possibly through creation of a centre to declassify historical documents, a newly released memo reveals. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Trudeau government eyes national declassification centre for historical spy documents

Requests filed under Access to Information Act are currently the main means of making security records available

Security intelligence expert Wesley Wark poses at the University of Ottawa’s Social Sciences Building in Ottawa, Tuesday, May 14, 2013. The Trudeau government is looking at ways to pry open Canada’s neglected national-security vaults, possibly through creation of a centre to declassify historical documents, a newly released memo reveals. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Security intelligence expert Wesley Wark poses at the University of Ottawa’s Social Sciences Building in Ottawa, Tuesday, May 14, 2013. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

COVID-19 a ‘failure of early warning’ for Canada, intelligence expert says

After SARS, Canada said it would integrate its approach to public health emergencies with its national security agenda

Security intelligence expert Wesley Wark poses at the University of Ottawa’s Social Sciences Building in Ottawa, Tuesday, May 14, 2013. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Sub-Lt. Jeffrey Paul Delisle is escorted by sheriffs from Nova Scotia provincial court in Halifax on Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Federal officials lost or possibly destroyed sensitive records about the case of a naval officer convicted of selling secrets to Russia, an investigation by Canada’s information commissioner has found. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan
Sub-Lt. Jeffrey Paul Delisle is escorted by sheriffs from Nova Scotia provincial court in Halifax on Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Federal officials lost or possibly destroyed sensitive records about the case of a naval officer convicted of selling secrets to Russia, an investigation by Canada’s information commissioner has found. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan
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