Almost 90 per cent of Canadian workers admit going to work sick: survey

More than one-quarter of professionals always go to the office with cold or flu symptoms

Flu season is upon us. Are your coworkers coming to work sick?

In a survey of over 500 Canadian workers, 89 per cent admitted they’ve come to the office with cold or flu symptoms.

Twenty-seven per cent even said they always go to work, even when they’re under the weather.

The survey, developed by staffing firm Accountemps and conducted by an independent research firm, found that more than half of respondents who said they report to the office with the cold or flu (54 per cent) do so because they have too much work to do. Another 33 per cent said they don’t want to use a sick day.

READ MORE: Everything you need to know before getting the flu shot

“Workers often worry about falling behind by taking a sick day, but that mentality may be doing more harm than good,” said Koula Vasilopoulos, district president for Accountemps.

“A healthy workplace is a happier, and ultimately more productive, environment. Taking the time to stay home and get better is not only good for your own wellbeing, it also shows consideration for your colleagues, your quality of work, and the overall success of your team.”

Vasilopoulos added it’s up to managers to set the example by steering clear of the office when under the weather and ensuring their teams follow suit.

As a possible solution for managing sick days, Vasilopoulos suggested providing remote work options.

READ MORE: Paid sick days could double under revised B.C. employment law



karissa.gall@blackpress.ca

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