(Pixabay)

First comes love, then comes marriage? Maybe not, says poll

Survey suggests slightly more than half of Canadians don’t think getting hitched is important

About half of Canadians don’t believe it’s necessary to get married, a new poll suggests.

Fifty-three per cent of us don’t feel marriage is any more of a commitment than a common-law relationship, according to a survey released by the Angus Reid Institute on Monday. Forty-nine per cent no longer believe marriage is particularly relevant.

Younger people are more likely to dismiss marriage’s relevance, the poll goes on to suggest, while just over half of seniors believe marriage continues to be important.

Nearly 60 per cent of Canadians think civil unions should be treated the same as marriages when it comes to taxes and separating assets post-divorce.

Adding kids to the picture didn’t make much of a difference, with 56 per cent saying children still weren’t key to getting married.

But for those who did still want to tie the knot, nearly 80 per cent believed it was at least somewhat important to live together beforehand.

Millennials were more skeptical of marriage, with 60 per cent of women in that demographic agreeing marriage isn’t overly relevant while 60 per cent of men flat out thought marriage wasn’t necessary.

Only 33 per cent of Canadians surveyed said society would be better off if people made marriage and children a priority, making them much less traditional than their neighbours down south.

A 2014 Pew Research poll suggests 46 per cent of Americans believe marriage and children should remain top priorities.

Similar splits were seen across the Canadian political spectrum: 48 per cent of Conservative voters thought getting hitched and having kids should be a priority, compared to less than 30 per cent of NDP and Liberal voters.


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Puff, puff, pass: Cannabis is officially legal across Canada

B.C. has only one bricks-and-mortar marijuana store

Cindy Young makes second run for top political job at the District of Hope

Young, in her run for mayor, is campaigning to attract business to Hope and keep local youth in the community

10 things still illegal in the new age of recreational cannabis

Pot is legal – but there are still a lot of rules, and breaking some could leave you in jail

New bus route to ‘replace’ Greyhound along Trans-Canada Highway

Rider Express Transportation says they will soon begin a bus service from Winnipeg to Vancouver

Six Sto:lo chiefs sign MOU agreement affirming Indigenous rights

Moving to next phase of nation-to-nation negotiation in preparation for final treaty

VIDEO: How to roll a joint

The cannabis connoisseur shares his secrets to rolling the perfect joint

Fraser Valley Throwdown returns this weekend

Abbotsford event back for third annual crossfit competition

B.C. Lions look to cement CFL playoff spot with victory over Eskimos

B.C. can cement a post-season berth in the wild West Division on Friday night with a home win over the Edmonton Eskimos

Canada ban on asbestos takes effect but mining residues are exempt

Environment Minister Catherine McKenna plans to announce the new regulations implementing the ban on Thursday in Ottawa

Harry and Meghan bring rain to drought-stricken Outback town

Prince Harry and his wife Meghan are on day two of their 16-day tour of Australia and the South Pacific.

Demand for legalized cannabis in early hours draws lineups, heavy web traffic

Government-run and privately operated sales portals went live at 12:01 a.m. local time across Canada, eliciting a wave of demand.

5 to start your day

Pot is legal across Canada but no pot shops in many Lower Mainland cities

Killer-rapist Paul Bernardo set to make parole pitch today

Paul Bernardo, whose very name became synonymous with sadistic sexual perversion, is expected to plead for release on Wednesday.

Hero campaign raises $1.1 million for Canada non-profits

Lowe’s Canada Heroes campaign was held throughout September

Most Read