Diane Long

Diane Long

Triple D will make you move

This Hope band is mischievously named ‘Triple D’ and they are here to make you move.

This Hope band is mischievously named ‘Triple D’ and they are here to make you move.

All being about the same age, these three women are unified as mothers who have 13 children between them. And as their children grow up, a new phase of life is opening up for Diane Long, Dorsey Summers, and Dagmar Lucak, alike in the first letter of their names (so Triple D), but ‘diverse’ in their approach to music, and their backgrounds.

Growing up by the PNE in Vancouver, Long always wanted to sing, and was inspired by her father, and grandmother. But life led her in another direction, first as an elite competitor in gymnastics, then as a young mother of six. It wasn’t until she was 30 that she first took voice lessons, and at 39 picked up the guitar. Blending her love for music with a career as a mental health worker, Long and her band “Cover Charge” performed at various functions and festivals.

Summers on the other hand made music a career, studying at the King Edward campus of Vancouver Community College, touring B.C. and Alberta for five years with a Janis Joplin tribute band known as Pearl Band, and the Maximum Blues Band. Along the way there was studio work, recording, producing, managing the business, as well as the very enjoyable employment on the luxurious Alaska and Caribbean cruise ships.

Lucak is a bit of a blend of them both, like Summers having a long involvement with music, but like Long advancing informally. Her earliest memory singing solo is at her Christmas kindergarten show in Quebec. In 1975 she moved to Hope, and started singing radio and TV jingles at age 14.

A few years later she met her husband, Bill Lucak, formerly the lead singer of Antrodemus. They went on to be foundational in the local Hope band, Foul Play, where a bunch of young players, who would all go on to long playing careers, congealed. The band included Gary Triplet on bass guitar, drummer Dennis Bucher, guitarist Landon Le May (several years with Skinny’s Blues Crew), and guitarist Greg Bradbury, currently with The Crew and The Hoodlums.

They “played 70’s and 80’s cover tunes,” as Bill puts it, but, already dating themselves, it is now called “classic rock.”

“I have always sung and still do, especially in the shower.” Bill Lucak confirmed this by looking down with a pursed lip smile. “I even sing to the ‘musak’ in the retail stores…” although she really, at the roots, now, just wants to make people move.

And charity work is a strong thread tying these women together.

Lucak has played a variety of charity events, from the Fraser-Hope Lodge extended care wing of the hospital, to the local branch of the diabetes association, to Hope’s first annual International Woman’s Day celebration, to helping raise funds for Darryl and Susan Hootnick after their house fire. Dorsey supported the Skin Bank of Canada, Children’s’ Hospital, Aim Association, and many cancer runs etc.

‘Triple D’ met here in Hope, and would jam with the guys in “acoustic-guitar, local- legend Dominic Palladino’s basement for years.”

They eventually formed a woman’s jam.

‘Triple D’ admits that when women jam it is different. Support and backup roles fluidly change. Lucak and Long agree, women are more polite, courteous, more attentive to feelings, and are more likely to help one another in other ways, like to “roady” for one another.

Bill Lucak, who is a featured guest on bass, agrees that guys can be more territorial. “Guys do their own thing.” He observes that when the women do their music they never fight, and the “egos are parked at the door.”

Long, who came into the music scene the latest of the three, has advice for other women like her: (just) “do it”.

“Don’t let anybody tell you can’t.” Even so she admits she really “gets the butterflies” before a gig…

With Triple D good solid tempo is big.

Summers brings with her songs from Patsy Cline to Janis Joplin offering a huge range of vocals. Blues Rock Swing is her favourite, a “swinging groove solid drummer” as she puts it.

Musical instrument aficionados will look forward to hearing her custom drums by Drums Only, Ayottes.

On Saturday, at the Hope Station house, you can hear them perform Puddle of Mudd’s, She Hates Me (the PG version), and What I Like about You of the Ramones. Long sings gutsy songs, not being a “sweet feminine voice”, so “enjoys the ‘Born to be Wild’ genre.” They will make you move with Stealing, Uriah Heep, Running Down at Dream, Tom Petty and Wild Nights, and Van Morrison.

Be moved this Saturday, March 19, at the St. Patty’s Day dinner and show at the Hope Station House. Tickets are available at Backstage Pass Emporium.

 

Just Posted

A young couple walks through the Othello Tunnels just outside of Hope. (Jessica Peters/Black Press)
Hope’s Othello Tunnels fully open to the public

Geological testing proved the area safe enough to open for the first time in more than a year

The Abbotsford International Airshow is back for 2021 with the ‘SkyDrive’ concept.
Abbotsford International Airshow returns for 2021 with ‘SkyDrive’

New format features a drive-in movie type experience, show set for Aug. 6 to 8

.
Fraser Health monitors long-term care vaccination rates amid local COVID-19 outbreak

COVID-19 transmission has largely been on the decline in Agassiz-Harrison

Jacqueline Pearce and Jean-Pierre Antonio received the BC Historical Federation Best Article Award on Saturday for their story about translating haiku written in the Tashme internment camp.
Article chronicling haiku in Japanese internment camp near Hope wins award

Tashme Haiku Club’s work was preserved and recently translated, authors write

Raeya Evie Duncan was the 100th baby born at Chilliwack General Hospital for the month of May. She is seen here with her parents Alysha Williams and Andrew Duncan on June 12, 2021. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
Baby boom in Chilliwack as record number of infants born at CGH in May

‘COVID babies are coming out,’ says dad of 100th baby born at Chilliwack General Hospital last month

Maxwell Johnson is seen in Bella Bella, B.C., in an undated photo. The Indigenous man from British Columbia has filed complaints with the B.C. Human Rights Tribunal and the Canadian Human Rights Commission after he and his granddaughter were handcuffed when they tried to open a bank account. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Heiltsuk Nation, Damien Gillis, *MANDATORY CREDIT*
VIDEO: Chiefs join human rights case of Indigenous man handcuffed by police in B.C. bank

Maxwell Johnson said he wants change, not just words, from Vancouver police

Tk’emlups te Secwepemc Chief Rosanne Casimir stands outside the former Kamloops Indian Residential School after speaking to reporters, in Kamloops, B.C., on Friday, June 4, 2021.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Kamloops chief says more unmarked graves will be found across Canada

Chief Rosanne Casimir told a virtual news conference the nation expects to release a report at the end of June

A woman wears a vaccinated sticker after receiving a COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination clinic run by Vancouver Coastal Health, in Richmond, B.C., Saturday, April 10, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
B.C. ranks among highest in world in COVID-19 first-dose shots: health officials

More than 76% of eligible people have received their 1st shot

A screenshot of the First Peoples Cultural Councils First Peoples’ Map. (First Peoples Cultural Council)
Online resource blends B.C.-Alberta’s Indigenous languages, art and culture

Advisor says initiative supports the urgent need to preserve Indigenous languages

An artists conception of the new terminal building at the Pitt Meadows Regional Airport.
Air travel taking off in B.C., but lack of traffic controllers a sky-high concern

There will be demand for more air traffic controllers: Miller

Canadian Armed Forces experts are on their way to North Vancouver after a local homeowner expressed worry about a military artifact he recently purchased. (Twitter DNV Fire and Rescue)
Military called in to deal with antique ‘shell’ at North Vancouver home

‘The person somehow purchased a bombshell innocently believing it was an out-of-commission military artifact’

Amy Kobelt and Tony Cruz have set their wedding date for February, hoping that more COVID-19 restrictions will have lifted. (The Macleans)
B.C. couples ‘gambling’ on whether COVID rules will let them dance at their wedding

Amy Kobelt and Tony Cruz pushed back their wedding in hopes of being able to celebrate it without the constraints of COVID-19

A plane is silhouetted as it takes off from Vancouver International Airport in Richmond, B.C., May 13, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Report calls for airlines to refund passengers for flights halted due to COVID-19

Conclusion: federal help should be on the condition airlines immediately refund Canadian travellers

Most Read