(The Canadian Press)

Canada sees info ‘gaps’ about dangerous goods moving through North

Ottawa is commissioning a study to help fill in the knowledge gaps and improve safety

The federal government says it doesn’t know enough about how, when and where dangerous goods move through the Canadian North, highlighting the potential risks of a major spill or other disaster.

As a result, Transport Canada acknowledges the possible effects on public safety and the environment are also unclear.

The department is commissioning a study to help fill in the knowledge gaps and improve safety.

READ MORE: Concerns grow about grey water in Canada’s Arctic: report shows it could double

A newly issued call for bids to carry out the study says work will focus on regions north of the 55th parallel as well as on isolated areas in Manitoba, northwestern Ontario and northern Quebec.

The goal is to fully identify the hazardous substances transported throughout these areas, along with major hubs that link to relevant airports, marine ports, ice roads, railroads, mines, manufacturing plants and warehouses.

The information will help Transport Canada pinpoint potential risks and make decisions concerning safety regulations and compliance.

The Canadian Press


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