Shawn Curran, MIDAS lab director, shows the Kootenays first 3D metal printer that arrived on site in Trail last week. (Submitted photo)

Shawn Curran, MIDAS lab director, shows the Kootenays first 3D metal printer that arrived on site in Trail last week. (Submitted photo)

First 3D metal printer in rural Canada arrives in Trail

MIDAS provides access to state-of-the-art equipment for fabrication and rapid prototyping

A Trail leader in technology development for students and the community at-large — often referred to as the “Fab Lab” — is now providing another golden learning opportunity for locals.

Previous: MIDAS Fab Lab, a golden opportunity

Previous: Minister sees high tech potential at Trail Fab Lab

Metallurgical Industrial Development Acceleration Studies, or “MIDAS” for short, just became the first rural fabrication lab in Canada to house a 3D metal printer.

“It’s big news for the Kootenay region as the benefits of having access to a machine of this kind will be felt throughout every local industry and sector,” says Cam Whitehead, executive director of KAST (Kootenay Association for Science & Technology).

“Metal printing is a game-changer for fabricating parts and prototypes,” he explained. “Lower costs and increased speed to produce prototypes means faster innovation and more competitiveness. This all means more jobs and wealth for the region,” Whitehead added.

“Our services are available to commercial members, unlike most universities these machines are so new and expensive that previous focus has been on research and not necessarily business needs.”

The Rapidia 3D Metal printer arrived at MIDAS Lab, located on Highway Drive in Glenmerry, arrived in the city last week. It is one of five machines to first come off of the assembly line.

The Rapidia can print a wide range of materials including stainless steel, inconel, tool steel, ceramics and titanium.

It can also be used by a broad range of users from ski and bike part manufacturers to the medical industry (inconel and titanium are used in medical tools and machines), to local industry partners like Teck Metals and Spearhead.

“MIDAS Lab is unique in Canada and has been since it opened its doors in 2016,” Whitehead continued. “We’re thrilled that it’s received countrywide recognition and we’re using some of the lessons learned to help other startup fabrication labs and innovation centres across B.C.,” he said.

“The Kootenays have always been leaders in innovation — it’s harder to live in rural communities, which means we’re often better at looking for something to make living or working easier.”

Having this type of 3D metal printer will enable users to make complex metal parts in a sustainable way.

Jason Taylor, a Selkirk College instructor who’s based in the Trail lab, says it’s taken a lot of research and insight into new ideas to decide on this specific printer.

“All in all, it’s an amazing opportunity,” Taylor explained.

“While there are printers that can do what the Rapidia can do, we chose this one because of its safe operation, and the speed at which you can operate and create the designs and parts (is what) our industry partners and Selkirk College, needs.”

In September 2020, Selkirk College will launch a two-year diploma program that trains graduates for advanced manufacturing called Digital Fabrication and Design.

Daryl Jolly, School of the Arts chair says the Rapidia 3D metal printer is an exciting new educational tool for students to get their hands on.

He says the machine can dramatically reduce costs for prototyping because it saves time with no additional tooling or fixturing used in traditional manufacturing required, less material is used, and complex assemblies can be created without welds, bolts or assembling.

“As we launch this new program, it’s exciting to again see that Selkirk College students will be trained on and have access to world-class equipment,” Jolly said.

“We expect our graduates will be well-positioned to support continued economic growth in our region, bringing value to industry and innovation.”

The Rapidia 3D metal printer uses a water-based process, which is the fastest and simplest way to 3D print complex metal parts in just two steps.

The water-based metal paste eliminates the debinding step, enabling the two-stage Rapidia process to produce most parts in under 24 hours.

The innovative support system cuts printing time further by avoiding the need to print a metal base plate or most metal supports, saving up to 90 percent of the metal normally wasted on these elements.

About KAST:

Since 1998, KAST has been a regional leader in economic development through technology and innovation. It is the only non-profit tech association serving the entire Kootenay region.



newsroom@trailtimes.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

RCMP don’t want to see you having your vehicle towed away after an aggressive driving infraction. (RCMP photo)
Chilliwack RCMP hand out more than 500 tickets in aggressive driving crackdown

Police say they’ll continue to focus on speeding, aggressive and distracted driving

Home sales for November in the Chilliwack and District Real Estate Board were profitable for sellers because of historically low supply. (Paul Henderson/ The Progress)
Historically low supply leads to higher prices in Chilliwack real estate market

City dwellers want to relocate to the eastern Fraser Valley and are willing to pay a high price

Riders will need to don face coverings to ski and snowboard at Manning this winter. (Manning Park Resort photo)
Manning Park slopes open early

Early season snowfall allowed for opening this weekend, 56 centimetre snow base recorded Nov. 30

Former Hope resident Jason Thomas Graff is set to be sentenced on charges of telecommunicating to lure a child and posession of child pornography at the Chilliwack Law Courts Jan. 28. (File photo)
Former Hope resident to be sentenced for child luring in Chilliwack court

Sentencing Jan. 28 at Chilliwack Law Courts following offences in Hope, Vancouver Island

Mr. Bergen, a statue of a working man, was stolen from a porch in Popkum on Nov. 18, along with a marble statue. (Submitted photo)
Heavy statue and fountain thieved off porch in Popkum

Rightful owner has had statue for 27 years and wants it returned

Motorists wait to enter a Fraser Health COVID-19 testing facility, in Surrey, B.C., on Monday, Nov. 9, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Another 694 diagnosed with COVID-19 in B.C. Thursday

Three more health care outbreaks, 12 deaths

Melissa David, of Parachutes for Pets and her dogs Hudson and Charlie are trying to raise money for a homeless shelter that will allow pets and are seen in Calgary, Alta., Thursday, Feb. 6, 2020.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
‘My only wish:’ Children asking pet charity to help their furry friends at Christmas

Parachutes for Pets says it has received 14 letters from children in the last week t

Melissa Velden and her chef-husband Chris Velden, stand in their dining room at the Flying Apron Inn and Cookery in Summerville, N.S. on Friday, Nov. 20, 2020. The couple is hosting holiday parties with appropriate distancing and other COVID-19 health protocols in place at their restaurant. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan
Celebrities, Santa and Zoom part of office holiday parties being held amid COVID-19

Many will send tokens of appreciation to workers or offer time off or cash

Cops converge in a Marshall Road parking lot on Thursday afternoon following a reported police incident. (Ben Lypka/Abbotsford News)
Federal offender escapes, gets shot at and is taken back into custody in Abbotsford

Several branches of law enforcement find escapee a short distance from where he fled

A demonstrator wears representations of sea lice outside the Fisheries and Oceans Canada offices in downtown Vancouver Sept. 24, demanding more action on the Cohen Commission recommendations to protect wild Fraser River sockeye. (Quinn Bender photo)
First Nations renew call to revoke salmon farm licences

Leadership council implores use of precautionary principle in Discovery Islands

Ten-month-old Aidan Deschamps poses for a photo with his parents Amanda Sully and Adam Deschamps in this undated handout photo. Ten-month-old Aidan Deschamps was the first baby in Canada to be diagnosed with spinal muscular atrophy through Ontario’s newborn screening program. The test was added to the program six days before he was born. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO, Children’s Hospital Eastern Ontario *MANDATORY CREDIT*
First newborn tested for spinal muscular atrophy in Canada hits new milestones

‘If Aidan had been born any earlier or anywhere else our story would be quite different’

(Pixabay)
Canadians’ mental health has deteriorated with the second wave, study finds

Increased substance use one of the ways people are coping

Lefeuvre Road, near Myrtle Avenue, was blocked to traffic on Thursday (Dec. 3) after an abandoned pickup truck was found on fire. Police are investigating to determine if there are any links to a killing an hour earlier in Surrey. (Shane MacKichan photo)
Torched truck found in Abbotsford an hour after killing in Surrey

Police still investigating to determine if incidents are linked

Most Read