An oil tanker offshore of Kinder Morgan's Westridge Marine Terminal in north Burnaby. Five times as many tankers would load if the company twins its Trans Mountain pipeline.

First Nation plans oil pipeline legal challenge

Tsleil-Waututh to fight Kinder Morgan twinning in court

The North Vancouver-based Tsleil-Waututh First Nation is going to court to attempt to delay and block Kinder Morgan’s proposed twinning of its Trans Mountain oil pipeline.

The band is targeting the National Energy Board’s review of the project, which would would result in a five-fold increase in the number of oil tankers passing through Burrard Inlet.

The aboriginal group will allege in Federal Court that the federal government and NEB both failed to adequately consult them on both the planned environmental assessment and regulatory review of the project.

“We will fight this unilateral and one-sided review process and this project with all legal means,” Tsleil-Waututh spokesman Rueben George said.

The band says its elders will be cross-examined by Kinder Morgan lawyers, but company experts and representatives won’t have to testify under oath.

The NEB would begin hearing aboriginal evidence in hearings starting this August and full oral hearings on the project would start in early 2015.

The $5.4-billion project would twin the 60-year-old oil pipeline that runs from northern Alberta to Burnaby, nearly tripling capacity to 890,000 barrels per day. The second 1,150-kilometre line would carry mainly diluted bitumen for export to Asia.

The band says tanker traffic would make oil leaks or spills inevitable and the risk of a catastrophic one is unacceptable.

The Green Party of Vancouver also said Sunday it will press for a plebiscite as part of the November municipal election on Kinder Morgan’s planned pipeline expansion.

Just Posted

River Monsters attract nearly 300 swimmers to their two-day meet

This was the third year for the now-annual event

PHOTOS: Sasquatch Days about ‘being proud of being Sts’ailes’

The joint event between Harrison and Sts’ailes returned to the village for its eighth year

‘This was my baby’: Music teacher to retire after 29 years at Kent Elementary

Brenda Di Rezze will be saying goodbye to her music room at the end of this school year

New Farmer’s Market coming to downtown Hope

Markets will be hosted every Friday on 3rd Avenue

SD78 growth plan to focus on inclusive learning, reading

Data collection and collaboration will help schools meet goals, superintendent says

10 facts about Father’s Day

Did you know that the special day for dads was first celebrated in 1910?

B.C. VIEWS: When farmland protection doesn’t protect farmers

Secondary residences aren’t mansions, families tell Lana Popham

Bombers down B.C. Lions 33-23 in season opener

Former Lion Andrew Harris leads Winnipeg with 148 rushing yards

Northern B.C. family remembers murdered Indigenous woman with memorial walk

Still no closure for Ramona Wilson’s family 25 years later

Pride flag taken down by Township of Langley

Woman said she was told it was removed from her front yard because of a complaint

B.C. university to offer mentorship program for former youth in care

Students using the provincial tuition waiver program will soon be able to form a community at KPU

Cyclists competing in one of the toughest bike races on the planet pass through Fernie

Divide riders looking strong as they finish first leg of 4160 km race

You might not know these B.C. records are public

Hired a lawyer to file a civil claim? Those are published online

B.C. bus driver loses case to get job back after texting while driving full bus

An arbitator ruled that Tim Wesman’s phone usage was a “a reckless disregard for public safety”

Most Read