Muddy mayhem planned at Island 22 park

The first Unbridled Mud Trials are set for Sept. 28

Test-pilot Amber Brown of Chilliwack touches down in one of the mud holes that will be featured in the first annual Unbridled Mud Trials at Island 22 on Sept. 28. Over 400 racers

Test-pilot Amber Brown of Chilliwack touches down in one of the mud holes that will be featured in the first annual Unbridled Mud Trials at Island 22 on Sept. 28. Over 400 racers

Take a five-kilometre run, then add 22 obstacles and lots of mud and water — and you have the first annual “Unbridled Mud Trials,” hosted by the Island 22 Equestrian Park Society.

These are horse people, so they know plenty about obstacles and mud. They also have 25 years of experience in running horse events at the island, near the north end of Young Road in Chilliwack.

Leave the horse at home though, and just bring your unbridled enthusiasm.

Co-organizer Andrea Meister said she had seen the Tough Mudder races and thought that a shorter, fun-focused event could be run by their club. She took her idea to fellow society member, Marnie Brown.

“Marnie’s daughter was involved in mud trials and Marnie has been organizing triathlons and other events for years,” said Meister.

That was in February of this year and the planning team has jumped through many hoops in a short time, including getting approval from the City of Chilliwack and the Fraser Valley Regional District, respectively the owners and operators of the island park.

Now, the group has a website at unbridledmudtrials.com and a slick online registration site at unbridledmudtrials-eorg.eventbrite.ca. They also have a plan for the course and two months to bring it together for the Sept. 28 challenge.

And yes, they have insurance.

“We’re trying to keep the horse jump use at a minimal but we suspect to be using around five,” said Meister. “Some of these jumps are a pretty decent size, so don’t think because a horse can jump them it will be a simple step over for a human.

“It’s difficult to say how high the highest obstacle will be. We’ll be having ropes, and climbing and we could easily go a good 15 feet (about five metres) or higher.”

Meister said they’ve been keeping women and kids in mind in their course design, so there’s a balance between upper-body, core and lower-body challenges.

“We’ll definitely be having crawling obstacles — and definitely the army crawl through mud,” said Meister. “And we’ll have water, mud baths, ropes, leaps, balancing… all those fun, crazy obstacles.”

Some will be training hard for it — but not all — and that’s fine with the organizers.

“I know a couple of people who are going to jump off their couch and walk the course,” said Meister. “Our main goal is to get people to have fun in the mud. It’s kind of childish!

“We will have volunteers around, so if people need a little push we will help them out…. and if you can’t do an obstacle, it’s okay. You can go around,” said Meister. “If you do, though, you can’t win.

“This is not officially a team run but a lot of people are running as a team with family and friends,” she added. “Every runner will have a timing chip and there will be prizes for the fastest in our three age division breakouts.”

Shaun Koopman and his fellow Hope Secondary 2004 grads Chantal Richmond, Jesse Walters, Jay Booth and Ryan Henderson went in the Tough Mudder challenge at Whistler last year. Lauren Pilzner of Kelowna was their other team member.

“We had a couple of sprains, strains and sore knees — but it was a blast,” said Koopman. “They had electrical shocks and ice baths and walls to knock down. It was taking from two-and-a-half to six hours to complete. The whole team stuck together, to help each other through.

“They had water hoses, to hose off with after the race and they chartered buses to take us back to town. The bus was pretty dirty!”

For the Chilliwack event, no buses are planned, so Meister said they are encouraging carpooling to help deal with limited parking space. Parking is by minimum donation of $5 — which is the only cost for spectators, who will have viewing access to 21 of the obstacles.

Hosing may be supplied by the fire department, said Meister, but that is still in the planning stages.

Various community groups will be running concessions and Meister said proceeds from the race will help the Island 22 Society improve the trails on the island.

If you’d like to try it out, you’ve got a couple of months to train for it. Trouble is: registration is almost full, with over 400 already booked in. Organizers are looking at adding one more wave of runners — but if you want in, you should act quickly.

Just Posted

.
Fraser Health monitors long-term care vaccination rates amid local COVID-19 outbreak

COVID-19 transmission has largely been on the decline in Agassiz-Harrison

Jacqueline Pearce and Jean-Pierre Antonio received the BC Historical Federation Best Article Award on Saturday for their story about translating haiku written in the Tashme internment camp.
Article chronicling haiku in Japanese internment camp near Hope wins award

Tashme Haiku Club’s work was preserved and recently translated, authors write

Raeya Evie Duncan was the 100th baby born at Chilliwack General Hospital for the month of May. She is seen here with her parents Alysha Williams and Andrew Duncan on June 12, 2021. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
Baby boom in Chilliwack as record number of infants born at CGH in May

‘COVID babies are coming out,’ says dad of 100th baby born at Chilliwack General Hospital last month

Nominate your neighbors for a 2021 Communities in Bloom/Miracle-Gro Best Garden Selection Award. (Facebook photo)
Hope Communities in Bloom puts out call for nominations

Twelve gardens will win a 2021 Communities in Bloom/Miracle-Gro Best Garden Selection Award

Migrating sockeye in the Fraser River August 7, 2007. (Fisheries and Oceans Canada)
First Nations, commercial, and recreational harvesters join forces to save Fraser River fish

‘We have to work together to rebuild these stocks while there is still time,’ says delegate

People watch a car burn during a riot following game 7 of the NHL Stanley Cup final in downtown Vancouver, B.C., in this June 15, 2011 photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Geoff Howe
10 years ago: Where were you during the 2011 Vancouver Stanley Cup Riots?

Smashed-in storefronts, looting, garbage can fires and overturned cars some of the damage remembered today

(Black Press Media file)
Dirty money: Canadian currency the most germ-filled in the world, survey suggests

Canadian plastic currency was found to contain 209 bacterial cultures

(pixabay file shot)
B.C. ombudsperson labels youth confinement in jail ‘unsafe,’ calls for changes

Review states a maximum of 22 hours for youth, aged 12 from to 17, to be placed in solitary

Eleonore Alamillo-Laberge, 6, reads a book in Ottawa on Monday, June 12, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Parents will need to fight ‘COVID learning slump’ over summer: B.C. literacy experts

Parents who play an active role in educating their children this summer can reverse the slump by nearly 80%, says Janet Mort

The border crossing on Highway 11 in Abbotsford heading south (file)
Western premiers call for clarity, timelines on international travel, reopening rules

Trudeau has called Thursday meeting, premiers say they expect to leave that meeting with a plan

The B.C. government’s vaccine booking website is busy processing second-dose appointments, with more than 76 per cent of adults having received a first dose. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
B.C.’s COVID-19 infections, hospitalizations stable for Tuesday

108 new confirmed cases, 139 in hospital, 39 in intensive care

A worker, at left, tends to a customer at a cosmetics shop amid the COVID-19 pandemic Thursday, May 20, 2021, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
Half of cosmetics sold in Canada, U.S. contain toxic chemicals: study

Researchers found that 56% of foundations and eye products contain high levels of fluorine

White Rock’s Marine Drive has been converted to one-way traffic to allow more patio space for waterfront restaurants. (Peace Arch News)
Province promotes permanent pub patios in B.C. post-pandemic plan

More than 2,000 temporary expansions from COVID-19 rules

Most Read